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PostSubject: On This Date   Tue Jan 01, 2013 11:40 pm

in 1879, the Brahms Violin Concerto was performed for the first time (Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra w/ violinist Joseph Joachim).

Just thought you might want to know that Cool

What a Face
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George Kaplan

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Tue Jan 01, 2013 11:44 pm

Pics or it didn't happen. Razz
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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Wed Jan 02, 2013 12:20 am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violin_Concerto_%28Brahms%29

PS : It was Bronislav Hubermann who got the last word in : "Of course it's a concerto against the violin -- and the violin wins !"

cheers cheers cheers

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Kyle Weiss

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Wed Jan 02, 2013 4:17 am

I think it's a very important date now, that I do.

Cool
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puros_bran
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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Wed Jan 02, 2013 10:53 am

George Kaplan wrote:
Pics or it didn't happen. Razz

This is pre-internet history.. You don't need pics, you need wiki articles.
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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Wed Jan 02, 2013 11:38 am

For stuff the klingons don't figure has potentially "sensitive" enough implications to require "perception management."

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beetlejazz

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Wed Jan 02, 2013 1:03 pm

I've never been a big fan of Brahms, but I'll try to make the effort of listening this tonight and giving it a chance. Any recommendations for a recording?
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peckinpahhombre

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Wed Jan 02, 2013 1:11 pm

Yak wrote:
in 1879, the Brahms Violin Concerto was performed for the first time (Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra w/ violinist Joseph Joachim).

Just thought you might want to know that Cool

What a Face

I am told Monbla was there in person. Perhaps he can describe for us what it was like.
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Rob_In_MO

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Wed Jan 02, 2013 1:21 pm

Years ago I had the pleasure of hearing Camille Saint-Saens Symphony #3 for Organ - Live!

I had heard this piece before (recordings), but this performance was a bit different. The organist must've been pissed off or something (maybe just having fun, who knows) because he kept increasing the volume level he was playing at in the finale.

Basically it turned into Orchestra vs. Pipe Organ - and the Pipe Organ won! It wasn't much of a contest once the organist incorporated the sub-bass manual - think controlled earthquake-like bass. Shocked

I haven't heard a thumping car stereo system yet that could compare to what I heard that night.
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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Wed Jan 02, 2013 9:49 pm



Very Happy What a Face Very Happy

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Wed Jan 02, 2013 11:44 pm

cat --

(Nominating you for the cat icon)

I'm assuming that you at least halfway like classical music to begin with (?)

Even if you do, Brahms can be tough to relate to quickly and easily. But his music is MORE than worth the effort involved. He isn't (by universal acclaimation) one of "the 3 B's" for no reason.

He was the most intelligent and deeply accomplished composer of the 19th Century. He was also, although a warm and incredibly generous man with his friends, a curmudgeon. He left a dinner party once with "If there is anyone here I haven't insulted, I apologise for the oversight." When he was playing through the first 'cello sonata he wrote (for an amateur friend), in the last movement (a dense fugue with an overpowering piano part), his friend complained "I can't hear myself !" Continuing to play, Brahms replied, "You don't know how fortunate you are !"

A famous silhouette cartoon of him made fun of his habitual walk with his bristling beard and hands behind his back. With him is a little, bristly hedgehog. Very apt.
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-w2lP6A1k0Ug/TxKfVEPj-aI/AAAAAAAAB4Y/gO-k_Ca8TY8/s1600/Brahms_silhouette.jpg

He could match Schubert for sheer, melodic beauty -- and did in many of his smaller works. He made a fortune with them ("Brahms' Lullaby" for example). And choral music -- "Wechsellied zum Tanze" blows me completely away.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=prAiY-118AI

But except for one sunny year,* in his serious works he avoided that approach, realising that giving in to the melodic impulse produced music with no potential for development into something greater that the melody already was -- the failure of Romantic music in a nutshell. Beethoven's ability to inexorably develop a simple idea into a monument haunted him all his life ("You have no idea what it is like to hear the footsteps of such a giant behind you"), and this, together with the polyphonic mentality of Bach, was the approach he took in his major works (Symphonies and Concerti).

What's funny about them is that, as "inaccessible" as they seem at first, when you get to know them, you see that he's actually writing with his heart on his sleeve. But thinking very deeply as he does so, so it's disguised. Listen to one 100 times and you're still just noticing little interior tunes that are the structural elements.
--------------
*THE most accessible "serious" work he wrote is the Horn Trio, Op. 40.

This is probably enough, I expect. So, happy listening.


Last edited by Yak on Thu Jan 03, 2013 11:13 am; edited 2 times in total
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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Thu Jan 03, 2013 1:02 am

If you're new to Brahms, here's a good one to get an idea of how he went about stuff. He takes a theme by Haydn and writes his own variations to it. By the end you'll have a feeling for the different ways he'll say the same thing. After a few variations it's his piece. Very accessible listening, too.


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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Thu Jan 03, 2013 1:13 am

Oh, before I forget, this one's for you, Yak. Very cool recording. Cool


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DrumsAndBeer

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Thu Jan 03, 2013 1:10 pm

MisterE wrote:
Oh, before I forget, this one's for you, Yak. Very cool recording. Cool


Coughers be damned! Razz

If you have a cough, stay home. Do not go to the symphony. Mad
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Kyle Weiss

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Thu Jan 03, 2013 1:54 pm

Good posts, all of you. Needed that this morning...just the right pace.

Cool
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DrumsAndBeer

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Sat Jan 05, 2013 7:23 pm

beetlejazz wrote:
I've never been a big fan of Brahms, but I'll try to make the effort of listening this tonight and giving it a chance. Any recommendations for a recording?

Deutsches Requiem with Karajan conducting the Wiener Philharmonic is pretty much outstanding. It's on Deutsche Grammophon, early 80's release I believe.
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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:03 pm

Not to disturb domestic tranquility but the German Requiem can be/is a hard piece to get into. The reason being that it's all in elaborate counterpoint with everything weaving into and through everything else in any given movement.

It's a masterpiece of polyphony, and a deeply moving composition. But even from the perspective of having rehearsed & performed it (violinist in the orchestra), it's about the opposite of immediately accessible (catchy tunes, infectious rhythm, &c.) More like looking into the depths of a deep, clear lake with a calm surface. Or 30 minutes of vanilla pudding.

Haydn Variations & Horn Trio for starters (instrumental).

What a Face


Last edited by Yak on Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Natch

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:38 pm

Great post, Yak, got me thinking that I need to "update" my music files on my MP3 player (yes, I still use one of those archaic devices!). Perhaps more Brahms is what I need?

Natch
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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:01 pm

I heartily recommend everything he ever wrote.

Get to really know his First Symphony. It's worth the time it takes.

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DrumsAndBeer

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PostSubject: Re: On This Date   Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:12 pm

Yak, normally I would agree, but based on her other posts she's listening to some out there stuff already. I wouldn't hesitate recommending the Requiem to someone already listening to Scriabin, Dvorak, Rachmaninoff & Khachaturian.

Personally I found access to Brahms through the Requiem. To me, so many of his other pieces seem less grand in terms memorable melodies. Where IHMO the Requiem lays it on thick, even if you have to take it in chunks like I had to with Mahler's second.

This opinion of coming from a casual listener of classical music & not someone who has performed it. Very Happy
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