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 What exactly is wiskey

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Bub

Bub

Registration date : 2007-12-15

What exactly is wiskey Empty
PostSubject: What exactly is wiskey   What exactly is wiskey EmptySat Mar 16, 2019 9:12 pm

This is a question that I have often pondered late at night.
The easy solution is to turn to Wikipedia.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whisky

Basically:
Whisky or whiskey is a type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash. Various grains (which may be malted) are used for different varieties, including barley, corn, rye, and wheat. Whisky is typically aged in wooden casks, generally made of charred white oak. Whisky is a strictly regulated spirit worldwide with many classes and types. The typical unifying characteristics of the different classes and types are the fermentation of grains, distillation, and aging in wooden barrels. wrote:

Wikipedia also lists 15 types of whiskeys.

American whiskys include:
American whiskey is distilled from a fermented mash of cereal grain. It must have the taste, aroma, and other characteristics commonly attributed to whiskey. Some types of whiskey listed in the United States federal regulations[8] are: Bourbon whiskey—made from mash that consists of at least 51% corn (maize) and aged in new charred oak barrels. Corn whiskey—made from mash that consists of at least 80% corn and is not aged, or, if aged, is aged in uncharred or used barrels. Malt whiskey—made from mash that consists of at least 51% malted barley Rye whiskey—made from mash that consists of at least 51% rye Rye malt whiskey—made from mash that consists of at least 51% malted rye Wheat whiskey—made from mash that consists of at least 51% wheat These types of American whiskey must be distilled to no more than 80% alcohol by volume, and barrelled at no more than 125 proof. Only water may be added to the final product; the addition of colouring or flavouring is prohibited. These whiskeys must be aged in new charred-oak containers, except for corn whiskey which does not have to be aged. If it is aged, it must be in uncharred oak barrels or in used barrels. Corn whiskey is usually unaged and sold as a legal version of moonshine. If one of these whiskey types reaches two years aging or beyond, it is additionally designated as straight, e.g., straight rye whiskey. A whiskey that fulfils all above requirements but derives from less than 51% of any one specific grain can be called simply a straight whiskey without naming a grain. US regulations recognize other whiskey categories,[8] including: Blended whiskey—a mixture that contains a blend of straight whiskeys and neutral grain spirits (NGS), and may also contain flavourings and colourings. The percentage of NGS must be disclosed on the label and may be as much at 80% on a proof gallon basis. Light whiskey—produced in the US at more than 80% alcohol by volume and stored in used or uncharred new oak containers Spirit whiskey—a mixture of neutral spirits and at least 5% of certain stricter categories of whiskey Another important labelling in the marketplace is Tennessee whiskey, of which Jack Daniel's, George Dickel, Collier and McKeel,[33] and Benjamin Prichard's[34] are the only brands currently bottled. The main difference defining a Tennessee whiskey is its use of the Lincoln County Process, which involves filtration of the whiskey through charcoal. The rest of the distillation process is identical to bourbon whiskey.[35][36] Whiskey sold as "Tennessee whiskey" is defined as bourbon under NAFTA[37] and at least one other international trade agreement,[38] and is similarly required to meet the legal definition of bourbon under Canadian law. wrote:

The list is rather overwhelming.
My list is rather narrowed and I have enjoyed a more limited selection..i.e., bourbon, scotch, and rye.
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