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 Looking for a chemist

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Bub

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Registration date : 2007-12-15

PostSubject: Looking for a chemist   Wed Feb 18, 2009 9:58 pm

Neil at http://www.apassionforpipes.com/A_Passion_for_Pipes/Blog/Entries/2009/2/17_The_Thermodynamics_of_Pipe_Smoking.html posted the following concerning pipe smoking :
"....pipe tobacco burns on average (in the combustion zone) at about 500 degrees Celsius. Cigarettes burn at about 670 degrees Celsius, and cigars burn at an intermediate average between pipes and cigarettes. With each smoking instrument, however, there is variability in temperature. For example, the maximum temperature a pipe smoker might achieve is 620 degrees Celsius whereas someone who has cultivated a slow, cool smoking style might smoke as low as 380 degrees Celsius."

I offered the thought that the higher temperatures associated with burning cigarettes might be associated with the formation of chemicals associated with cancer. In contrast, these chemicals might not form during pipe smoking at lower temperatures.

Neil also quoted a source that identified three main zones in burning tobacco (cigarette and pipe) : (a) the actual glowing point, where oxidation takes place, called in the following the "combustion zone," (b) the "distillation zone," where no actual glowing occurs but where the temperature is high and dry distillation quite strong, and (c) the zone farthest from the glow point, where the temperature is low and where, for that reason, condensation of dry distilled material can take place, and which is hence called the "condensation zone."

Does this suggest that smoking tobacco in a pipe could remove some of the harmful chemicals in tobacco?

Any thoughts?

Bub
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Doc Manhattan

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Age : 39
Location : Land of Steady Habits
Registration date : 2008-05-26

PostSubject: Re: Looking for a chemist   Wed Feb 18, 2009 10:35 pm

Not a chemist, but I know from food science that at least one kind of carcinogen found in tobacco smoke, nitrosamines, are produced in greater quantities at higher temperatures. So you might be onto something there.

I suspect that the metallic compounds found in cig smoke might not be amerliorated by cooler smoking, but it was my impression that pipe smoke contained few if any of these to begin with.
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Winslow

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Age : 71
Location : Midlothian,Va.
Registration date : 2008-04-11

PostSubject: Re: Looking for a chemist   Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:02 am

It's all about inhaling the smoke as far as I know.Nasal Snuff is not burned
so not many carcinogens are created.I knew cigarette smokers that didn't inhale
and they didn't get the complications this causes. Neutral

Winslow sunny
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Justpipes
The Duke
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Age : 58
Location : Randolph County, NC If you don't know, you wouldn't understand.
Registration date : 2007-12-17

PostSubject: Re: Looking for a chemist   Thu Feb 19, 2009 8:21 am

I believe and it is only my humble opinion that the most danger lies with in full inhaling as well as the in the chemicals associated with cigarette manufacturing. The reason I say that and as Winslow pointed out, the brief time that I smoked cigarettes on a daily basis many years ago, it made me feel awful. I threw the cigarettes in the trash after a short stint. I feel not ill affects from pipe smoking.
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PostSubject: Re: Looking for a chemist   Thu Feb 19, 2009 9:37 am

I would have to agree with the inhaling, the temperature issues sound plausable also. My theory goes along with the massive amounts of foreign chemicals in most mass produced cigarettes as well as the burnt paper and the fibers inhaled from filters. IMHO it's a combination of all this stuff together as well as the ease of obtaining, lighting up, & chain smoking of cigarettes that contribute to the health problems of cigy smokers. From what I've read it's mouth and throat problems associated with pipers, which good hygene should solve.

My .02
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Registration date : 2008-07-02

PostSubject: Re: Looking for a chemist   Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:57 pm

I have to throw in my two cents,,,I smoked cigarettes for years,,,I agree the chemical aspect is a major consideration, along with the habit of automatically reach ing for a cigarette and smoking it almost unaware, I think the substandard tobacco (compared to pipe) and process chemicals reduced my olfactory senses and clogged my tastebuds. I have now ( smoking pipe only )regained some but not all back. besides now lighting a pipe has meaning, not just a reflex. I wonder if the cake absorbs toxins along with the tar,,,interesting thread,,,
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