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 Good day for chili

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PostSubject: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 11:35 am

Hey guys, I have a few minutes of free time at work and I wanted to post, but didn't have too much to say, so I figure I'd share with you my chili recipe that will be done when I get home.

It took me about 10 years to get this recipe (at least to my tastes).

I make my chilis and stews in a crock pot. The only difference this time is many people tell me they dont brown the meat prior to putting it in the pot.

So I started with some lean sirloin (last night) and put it on high in the crock pot last night along with the spices, finely diced onions, and some tomato paste for thickening. This cooked on high until I wen to bed about 1 am when I turned to low.

It cooked all night, essentially browning the meat. This morning it already looked like chili. I added about 40 oz (could tell from the blender) of diced tomatos, 3 serrano, 3 raw jalapeno, and 1 habanero peppers. My secret ingredient has always been a can of beer.

This will simmer all day. If it's not thick like I want it, I'll add some corn starch. Otherwise, I'll leave it be to avoid any unnecessary carbs.

There is a 10 % chance of snow which is alot for down here. Regardless, this is going to be good after my afternoon workout.
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Trout Bum

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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 1:24 pm

Man, do I like a good bowl of chili. Your recipe is pretty interesting, and sounds nice and spicy, which I like. No beans, eh. That's kinda hard for me, but it's funny, just in the last couple of days I have been considering reducing carbs in my diet, and that sounds like an awesome recipe -- thanks for posting it!
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Centurian 803
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 2:11 pm

That recipe sure sounds good. I'm used to chili with beans but have had it without and enjoyed it. Enjoy. We have a 30% chance for snow tonight and now you've got me thinking about making a pot full.
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gandalfpc

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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 2:23 pm

What's your spice blend?
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jhuggett
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 2:42 pm

You think he'll give that up? Laughing

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gandalfpc

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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 2:46 pm

I got the impression he was going to "spill the beans" Smile
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kilted1
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:23 pm

It's odd to me how variable 'chili' and regional interpretations are. In Texas I think most would consider it a hanging or shooting offense to put beans (of any kind) in chili. The dish comes from Spanish/Mexican chile con carne meaning literally chiles (peppers) with meat, and is probably at least partially responsible for the rigid Texas 'rules' regarding beans. Some also hold that tomatoes are illegal as well.

Having spent many years in Texas and participating in regional Chili cook offs in Abilene and San Angelo for several years, I learned a good bit about chili and chili-head culture. I guarantee you a good time if you've never been to one. Walking around watching people 'fine tune' their chili is fun and entertaining, especially those with a sense of humor, like the guy (there is always at least one) who has an open can of Alpo sitting next to his chili pot.

When I cooked for competition, I relied heavily upon a fixed (and constantly updated) recipe perfected by the efforts of several friends, we worked together on crafting our competition entry. We never placed in the top five, but had several enter the top ten - considering the first round would sometimes be over 100 entries not bad placement at all.

At home my chili is almost never exactly the same twice, because for the home I think of chili almost as a living thing, depending upon what red meats you have available at the time, what peppers fresh and dried you might have available also. My chili is 'crafted' as I go, adjusting and fine tuning the spice balance right up until just shortly before it it is served. If you cannot deal with spicy, don't bother me, I don't know how, nor am I interested in cooking whimpy chili. Go buy a can of Wolf Brand chili and leave me alone. If on the other hand you don't mind sweating through your shirt, pull up a chair and I'll serve you a bowl.

3-5 pounds red meat (beef flank, skirt steak, or lean ground beef, venison, steaks or ground, antelope steaks or ground)

If steaks or non ground meat is used, dice it very finely.

1/2-2 pound fresh pork sausage (only used IF the red meat is mostly lean, some fat content is needed for a rich meaty chili)

1 or 2 fresh onions (any variety will do really, I'm now very partial to Vidalias since I now live in Georgia)
Fresh garlic minced (5-10 cloves depending on size)

Herbs should be added and adjusted to taste, start with about 1 teaspoon/pound of meat, herbs aren't written in stone, feel free to experiment. (Some interesting options, basil, curry powder, different varieties of Oregano, Mexican, Greek, Italian, white or green pepper)

Whole cumin seed
Cumin powder
Dried Oregano
Dried Marjoram
Dried Thyme
Nutmeg (1/2 teaspoon/pound of meat)
Fresh ground black pepper (by tablespoon)
*Secret ingredient* 1/2 teaspoon of unsweetened cocoa/pound of meat (If you've every had Pollo Mole you know where I got this idea)
Course Salt

Peppers:

Fresh jalapeno 3 (maybe more later)
Fresh serrano 3 (maybe more later)
Fresh habanero 1

Dried Chiles: (prepared in various ways, cut into very fine strips, crushed in a mocahete (mortar and pestle) or the easy way in a blade type coffee grinder)

Arbol 5-10
Pasilla Negro 1-2
Ancho 2-3
Pequin 5-10 (if you can't find these little peppers sometimes called bird peppers a couple tablespoons of Cholula chili sauce is a good substitute)

1 can of Italian style tomato paste (used for a little bit of tomato flavoring but mostly to enhance the color a bit)

Step 1

In a couple of tablespoons of virgin olive oil brown the diced onion, when it begins to look translucent, add in first round of dried herbs, ground dried chiles, fresh chiles and garlic, but don't let the garlic brown too much it will taste burned. Throw in a couple of tablespoons of water at the end to cool it down, scoop out and set aside.

Step 2

In the same pan add a couple tablespoons of virgin olive oil and start browning small batches of your meats, repeat until all meat is browned.

Step 3

In your large crockpot, dutch oven, or whatever you use for large stews, put in browned meat and spice mixture. Add a couple cups of water (however much is enough to make it fairly soupy) Add in tomato paste, cover and bring it up slowly to a simmer. Once you have established a good simmering rate allow it to simmer for at least an hour. Once it has cooked down some taste and adjust spices and herbs as needed, it's not going to taste just right the first couple of times. After about two hours of this, adjusting taste about every 15 minutes or so, you can then start working on the desired thickness. You may add water as necessary or let it simmer with the lid off to reduce water content as needed. I like mine thick enough to cling to the spoon.

Serve with soda crackers, corn tortillas or tortilla chips, grated cheese or sour cream as desired and LOTS of whatever you like to drink.

Warning, you are going to fart, and it might damage things, be prepared! affraid


Last edited by kilted1 on Sat Dec 05, 2009 12:59 am; edited 6 times in total
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:40 pm

Momma always used red kidney beans in her chili, so to this day chili without beans goes on a hotdog (to me anyhow). Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 4:27 pm

Yeah I was taught that chili without beans was sacrilage. Remember I'm in SOUTH Texas, which is basically North Mexico.

I've used chocolate in my chili, didn't see the big deal. I've used dried poblano peppers, don't see the need. Also, many people prefer the ground meat version to the chunky one I am preparing tonight.

I've been tweaking this recipe for more than 10 years actually. I guess I can give up some of my secrets.

My spice blend is nothing special. This is with about 2 lbs of sirloin. And I used:
2 tbsn garlic powder (fresh garlic is always better but I forgot to buy some)
2tbsn black pepper (you decide if you want to grind peppercorns)
2 tbsn of chili powder (this is what actually makes chili taste like chili and not carne guisada)
2 tbsn of cumin
1 teaspoon of cayenne (or less)

Oregano, I can take it or leave it, I didn't use it this time. But, my secret ingredient is actually the can of beer I use. Something about it gives it a unique taste; I imagine it's the barley.

I made it once with a hershey bar in it (and tried the cocoa method) and found it pointless. If you can taste the damned chocolate, you just need to add more peppers.

Also, I've made this with 3 habanero peppers and it was ridiculously hot. I should of used birds eye peppers in a mortar as well, but I think there are plenty of peppers in it already.
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stan41



Age : 76
Location : Central Texas
Registration date : 2009-02-16

PostSubject: Antique Chili Recipe   Fri Dec 04, 2009 6:51 pm

I have long been a fan of good chili. I am with the anti-bean crowd.

This is a very old recipe from back in the 1920's. Bill Richards ran a cafe in our town and his chili was locally famous. I never did eat any that he made, but I got his recipe and have tried it. It is really good. Notice that is doesn't have any chili powder, onions, or tomato products of any kind.

BILL RICHARDS ORIGINAL CHILI


8 lbs. coarse ground meat (the best is from around the neck bones.)
3 lbs. suet ( Beef fat)
4 pods dried red chili peppers
6 cloves garlic
1 tsp. cumin seed
10 pods dried chili petines
1 tsp. black pepper
1 Tablespoon salt

Method: Place meat and suet in a large skillet and brown until the suet melts. Pour this into a large covered pot.
Boil all the 4 chili pods in a pint of water until they are soft.
Open the pods and let seeds out in water. Set aside.
Grind the red hot peppers first and then grind the chili petines, garlic and cumin seed. (Follow with three crackers to clean the grinder)
Add salt and black pepper and dump into the meat. Use a wire strain - pour red colored water off the peppers into the pot. Do not allow any seed in pot.;
Simmer about 45 minutes covered, stirring occasionally.

Stan41
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LL

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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 7:54 pm

Texas Outlaw wrote:
...of diced tomatos,

affraid affraid affraid

AHHHHHHH!!!!


A guy with "Texas" in his name no less?!
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stan41



Age : 76
Location : Central Texas
Registration date : 2009-02-16

PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 7:59 pm

LL wrote:
Texas Outlaw wrote:
...of diced tomatos,

affraid affraid affraid

AHHHHHHH!!!!


A guy with "Texas" in his name no less?!

Hard to believe, ain't it?

Stan
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Smokey Joe

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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 8:55 pm

Never tried a bean-less chili before but it sounds good. It's the perfect timing too, its about to get cold around these parts santa
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Rad Davis

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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 8:58 pm

The first chili cook-off known to modern man took place in 1967 in uninhabited Terlingua, Texas (once a thriving mercury-mining town of 5,000 people). It was a two-man cook-off between Texas chili champ Wick Fowler (a Dallas and Denton newspaper reporter) and H. Allen Smith (humorist and author), which ended in a tie.

The cook-off challenge started when H. Allen Smith wrote a story for the Holiday magazine titled Nobody Knows More About Chili Than I Do, which raised the wrath of Texas chili graduate students.

Chili H. Allen Smith

2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
4 pounds beef sirloin or tenderloin, coarse chili grind
1 6-ounce can tomato paste
4 cups water
3 medium onions, coarsely chopped
1 green bell pepper, cored, seeded and coarsely chopped
4 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 tablespoons ground hot red chile peppers
1 tablespoon dried oregano (preferably Mexican)
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon cumin seed or ground cumin
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Heat the oil or butter (or a blend of the two) in a heavy 4-quart pot over medium heat. Add the meat to the pot. Break up any lumps with a fork and cook, stirring occasionally, until the meat is evenly browned.

Stir in the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil, then lower heat and simmer, uncovered, for 2 to 3 hours. Stir occasionally and add more water if necessary. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Serves 8.

This is great chili.


Here's a link to "Nobody Knows More About Chili Than I Do":

http://www.chilicookoff.com/History/History_Started.asp

Chili: It's a guy thing.

Rad
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kilted1
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 9:47 pm

Rad Davis wrote:


Chili: It's a guy thing.

Rad

And every guy who makes chili believes HIS is the BEST Twisted Evil

My wife's Mexican/American family all LOVE mine, though some say it's TOO HOT!!! Others grab some fresh Jalapenos to go with it!!!

BTW IMHO you shouldn't every really taste the chocolate I add to mine, it just helps enhance other flavors. As in a good non-verde mole sauce you don't really taste chocolate as in chocolate candy, what you taste is a very complex balance of heat, herbs and spices ...

When you read the ingredients of most commercial 'chili powders' you will find a variety of dried chiles, herbs, spices and cumin. Commercial 'chili powders' are variable in heat and flavor ranges, some are great, some suck pond water. I don't generally find them 'necessary'.

Two great uses for chili powder: 1. sprinkle it over popcorn, 2. sprinkle it over fresh corn on the cob


Last edited by kilted1 on Sat Dec 05, 2009 12:35 am; edited 1 time in total
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LL

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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:04 pm

Heh heh...

I'm NOT kidding about this.

Would you believe a certain tobacco blender named Gregory Pease is a chilihead? And that he's won a number of cook-off prizes for his recipe?

Imagine the same mind, schnozz, and taste buds responsible for the symphony of flavors that is Westminster being turned loose in a spice shop... and then hauling his selections into a kitchen with a slab of tri-tip and a big cast iron pot.

I've tasted it. Absolutely amazing.

The problem is he ain't talkin'. It's perfectly proper chili etiquette to be secretive, misleading, and sneaky, but this is stuff is addictive. And that ain't fair. Evil or Very Mad
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puros_bran
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:35 pm

Click here


Listen to Cincinnati Chili..

We watched him in Lexington..awesome, hilarious, to frikkin funny.
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:53 pm

I underestimated these peppers. This is a mild chili... I often use what you guys are calling chili pequins (birds eye peppers), but didn't this time.

The thing about these at least in my area: only the ones growing wild are hot, the ones farm raised are very mild, so I didn't bother. I also should of used one of those dried red peppers that I do sometimes.

One good thing: The flavor really came through. At times, when I am overzelous with peppers, the heat will keep you from actually experiencing the flavor. I gotta say, I believe this batch would of benefited by a hershey bar or some powder to bring out more complexity.

Oh well, next time, i'll double the peppers.
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 11:14 pm

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Trout Bum

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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 11:40 pm

Yo, Outlaw, I'll be right over.
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Fri Dec 04, 2009 11:52 pm

bout the only thing missing is some cheddar cheese, but as you guys know, I'm trying to be healthy. So to cut down on the saturated fat, I went with no cheese, just black olives and a dallop of sour cream. I should of stood a fork up in it to show you guys the wonderful thickness.
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Sat Dec 05, 2009 10:21 am

"in uninhabited Terlingua, Texas (once a thriving mercury-mining town of 5,000 people)."

there might be a clue there somewhere, im just saying..
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Sat Dec 05, 2009 11:28 am

Wide Awake wrote:
"in uninhabited Terlingua, Texas (once a thriving mercury-mining town of 5,000 people)."

there might be a clue there somewhere, im just saying..

HAR!!! Kentucky Humor at its finest!
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Sat Dec 05, 2009 11:36 pm

Your recipe sounds good and my pot is simmering as I write this. I do brown my meat before the crock pot. It's down to a frosty 55 or so down here so I figure I needed something to warm me up LOL.
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PostSubject: Re: Good day for chili   Sun Dec 06, 2009 1:43 am

Cooldaddypop wrote:
Your recipe sounds good and my pot is simmering as I write this. I do brown my meat before the crock pot. It's down to a frosty 55 or so down here so I figure I needed something to warm me up LOL.

You out of bourbon?
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