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 How a watch works

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Bub

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Registration date : 2007-12-15

PostSubject: How a watch works   Sat Sep 11, 2010 11:20 pm

Be honest...can you watch this video and say that you know how a watch works?
http://www.wimp.com/watchworks/
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Lupulus

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Age : 35
Location : New Hampshire
Registration date : 2010-08-18

PostSubject: Re: How a watch works   Tue Sep 14, 2010 8:32 am

Wow, that was really informative, I have always wondered how an automatic watch works. I own several, but had only a vague notion of how the internals work.
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Jack Straw

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Age : 34
Location : Brooklyn
Registration date : 2009-08-27

PostSubject: Re: How a watch works   Tue Sep 14, 2010 8:37 pm

Cool! Makes me glad I wear an automatic watch.
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Puff Daddy
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Age : 53
Location : South of heaven
Registration date : 2007-12-09

PostSubject: Re: How a watch works   Tue Sep 14, 2010 9:13 pm

An automatic watch is one of the fine, simple, mechanical creations that we can still enjoy. I hate a watch that goes tick-tock. Anyone can make a quartz or digital watch, and aside from aesthetics, there ain't much difference between a high end quartz and a $25 Casio. A mechanical, however, requires a little attention and an appreciation of the mechanism, but that's all part of the lure of the thing. Like briar pipes, they are fine things befitting a gentleman. Or even a schmo like me rabbit

With the Seiko and Miyota movements, very sound, solid mechanicals can be had for around $200. I wear a Seiko 200 meter automatic diver myself and I absolutely love the thing. I highly recommend reading up on automatics and getting yourself one. I have a modest wish list going and hope to add an Omega Seamaster down the road when the economy improves, and would love to have a rose gold Hamilton Jazzmaster Viewmatic for a dress watch. They are the one piece of man jewelry I find appropriate.

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gandalfpc

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Age : 50
Registration date : 2009-10-03

PostSubject: Re: How a watch works   Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:26 am

Good old mechanical pocket watches - pre 1940 for me - here is a nice example, not mine...

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LAEarl

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Registration date : 2010-07-23

PostSubject: Re: How a watch works   Wed Sep 15, 2010 10:57 am

I have an intense curiosity of mechcanicals. Sometime ago I took to watchmaking a a brief hobby. I purchased a Waltham 1908 pocketwatch that was intact but not working and disassembled it finding that it had only the oil gummed up due to age. The lubes widely used were derived from whale oil and after many years it would "gum up the works". By dipping the parts into solvent and proper application of modern synthetic oils it began working again for the first time in many untold years!

It is a hobby that requires the utmost patients and attention to detail. Working with parts that one can barely see with the naked eye can be frustrating. Once I was holding a screw in my tweezers getting ready to place it into its hole when it was gone. Poof! One second it was there and next not. Sad I never found it and since parts were hand made they are difficult to find.

I had to give it up due to time and other hobbies that required more attention. It is certainly the most rewarding.
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gandalfpc

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Age : 50
Registration date : 2009-10-03

PostSubject: Re: How a watch works   Wed Sep 15, 2010 11:17 am

LAEarl wrote:
I have an intense curiosity of mechcanicals. Sometime ago I took to watchmaking a a brief hobby. I purchased a Waltham 1908 pocketwatch that was intact but not working and disassembled it finding that it had only the oil gummed up due to age. The lubes widely used were derived from whale oil and after many years it would "gum up the works". By dipping the parts into solvent and proper application of modern synthetic oils it began working again for the first time in many untold years!

It is a hobby that requires the utmost patients and attention to detail. Working with parts that one can barely see with the naked eye can be frustrating. Once I was holding a screw in my tweezers getting ready to place it into its hole when it was gone. Poof! One second it was there and next not. Sad I never found it and since parts were hand made they are difficult to find.

I had to give it up due to time and other hobbies that required more attention. It is certainly the most rewarding.

Actually do a bit of watchmaking myself Smile

And I should have the screw you need - those screws are not handmade - Waltham factory material - and I have a 1908 parts watch laying about I'm fairly sure. Shoot me a pic with the screw location marked and I will see if I have the one you need.

The poof comes from a bit too much tweezer pressure - shooting the screw like a watermelon seed - have spent plenty of time on the floor sweeping with a magnet looking for those - some go over 20 feet Smile

Parts for old pocket watches can also be had from Uncle Larry's watch shop - a search at google will churn him up Smile
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LAEarl

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Registration date : 2010-07-23

PostSubject: Re: How a watch works   Wed Sep 15, 2010 11:37 am

I sure will! It isn't a very expensive watch but I like it Smile

My father has an old Hamilton that I love!

I have a fair amount of parts and movements stored away. Most of the movements are small and are missing hands, dials, & cases but run! That 1908 is the only sz 18 movement I have.

I really wanted to delve into watchmaking much deeper too many other things take my attention. So I have been selling off some items on ebay, staking tools, movement holders, ect. I have kept my goods screwdrivers, tweezers, loupes, ect. I have a watch making video DVD set up now Wink

Here
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gandalfpc

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Age : 50
Registration date : 2009-10-03

PostSubject: Re: How a watch works   Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:18 pm

Seems I was thinking of the model 1883 Waltham Sad

from what I am seeing the 1908 is a 16 size Vanguard - will have to dig up my waltham book to be sure (just doing some quick internet poking)


---

Ok - dug up the waltham manual - the 1908 is a 16 size
all material used in the 1908 model is the same as that used in the 1899 model except for the balance cock crown wheel and winding pinion so you can steal screws from those also

I have the parts list with every part in the watch, but waltham didn't consider that to include screws so I can't give you size/threads Sad

Most of my more serious tools have also been sold, as my hands can no longer take the punishment of such small work, but I still have my screwdrivers and oilers and such along with a half dozen watches in various stages of assembly...
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