Quantcast

Aromatics??

Help Support Brothers of Briar:

Davey

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
304
Reaction score
0
If an "Aromatic" is anything flavored...why isn't a cavandish blend considered such...or for that matter anything "yopped" or "cased"...?


"I confused....."
 

Puff Daddy

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Council Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2007
Messages
6,897
Reaction score
0
I think that the short answer is that if a tobacco is so heavily topped that the point is for the topping flavor/aroma to be the dominant characteristic, then it's an aromatic. If the tobacco is lightly topped or cased so as to enhance or complete it's intended flavor profile, then it's not an aromatic. That's how I view it anyhow.
 

Davey

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
304
Reaction score
0
Wow..after all my confusion, that was a pretty basic ( and common sense) answer.

Clears up the subject. Now lets see.....next on my list of queries....
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Cavendish is actually a particular way of processing tobacco, but is commonly used to mean aromatic which it may not be.
 

glpease

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
545
Reaction score
0
Davey":a3fbc2bm said:
If an "Aromatic" is anything flavored...why isn't a cavandish blend considered such...or for that matter anything "yopped" or "cased"...?
Cavendish may or may not be aromatic, as it may or may not be flavoured. Looesly speaking, cavendish is a tobacco that has been processed in a particular way - either through steam and heat (American and "Dutch" cavendish), or through pressing in steam jacketed presses (English). Often, these tobaccos are cased (the addition of sugars and SOME flavouring components) before processing. Sometimes, they are also flavoured.

Unfortunately, given the somewhat nebulous "definition," or lack of one, of the term, it's usually pretty meaningless when used in a tobacco description, apart from the most common connotation of the term, which, at least in the US, is "aromatic." They've become almost, but not quite synonymous here.
 

alfredo_buscatti

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 17, 2007
Messages
2,217
Reaction score
0
To me, an aromatic's appeal is primarily to the nose. Notice "aroma" trapped inside "aromatic."
 

showme1or2

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
253
Reaction score
0
I've noticed that burley is a common ingredient in aromatic tobaccos (and many tobaccos termed cavendish). Is this because burley readily takes on the characteristics of whatever is being added?

I don't get along well with burley tobacco and often will not try a blend more based on the fact that it is burley than aromotic or cavendish, which both often carry negative connotations. Can anyone recommend some good aromatics that are burleyless?

showme
 

glpease

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
545
Reaction score
0
showme1or2":etoda8uv said:
I've noticed that burley is a common ingredient in aromatic tobaccos (and many tobaccos termed cavendish). Is this because burley readily takes on the characteristics of whatever is being added?

I don't get along well with burley tobacco and often will not try a blend more based on the fact that it is burley than aromotic or cavendish, which both often carry negative connotations. Can anyone recommend some good aromatics that are burleyless?
The structure of burleys make them ideal for aromatics. They take up the flavouring sauces readily, and provide good body, and a taste that is harmonious with the sweeter toppings. Often, virginias are also added to the mix both for their own flavour, and to mitigate some of the strength and alkalinity of burleys, and other spice tobaccos are sometimes used. But, basically, if you want to sauce burleys, all you have to do is spray the stuff on, and let the open structure of the leaf take it up.

There are VA based aromatics, but they require more processing, as the leaf must be steamed, or the sauce heated in order to "open up" the leaf sufficiently for it to take up the sauce. There are aromatics with little or no burley in them, but as I'm not very familiar with tobaccos of that genre, I'll leave it up to someone who is to make recommendations.
 

smokey422

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 21, 2007
Messages
498
Reaction score
0
showme1or2":xwb261as said:
I've noticed that burley is a common ingredient in aromatic tobaccos (and many tobaccos termed cavendish). Is this because burley readily takes on the characteristics of whatever is being added?

I don't get along well with burley tobacco and often will not try a blend more based on the fact that it is burley than aromotic or cavendish, which both often carry negative connotations. Can anyone recommend some good aromatics that are burleyless?

showme
It's not billed as an aromatic, but Just For Him tobacco shop in Springfield, MO has a VA/Per called Golden Cashmere with an aroma my wife absolutely loves. AFAIK it contains no burley. www.justforhim.com.

Smokey
 
Top