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Can dry tobacco be rehydrated?

glpease

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This question comes up often, and I've always said no. After a little experimentation, I'm prepared to say I was wrong. Sort of. A new article in the Briar And Leaf Chronicles talks about this. Enjoy!

-glp
 
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Anonymous

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I have been rehydrating tobacco for a long time

At one time I would boil the water I used but not any more
I use a bowl and put a moistned cotton cloth over the top and let sit over night

Or I just wait for an all day rain and put it in a bowl and in about 4 to 6 hours it will be moist

If it gets to moist just let sit in an uncovered bowl untill it's just right
 

Carlos

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Good deal. I have been quite pleased with bringing back some fairly dry blends. Most recently using water pillows, laying on top of their plastic bags, which in turn was laying upon the dry tobacco inside of a hard Ziplock container. Took several days to feel right to me. The water pillow got noticeably smaller.

This way no tobacco was actually wet. I hope to reduce any chance of mold in this manner.
 

glpease

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Carlos":a97zocuj said:
Good deal. I have been quite pleased with bringing back some fairly dry blends. Most recently using water pillows, laying on top of their plastic bags, which in turn was laying upon the dry tobacco inside of a hard Ziplock container. Took several days to feel right to me. The water pillow got noticeably smaller.

This way no tobacco was actually wet. I hope to reduce any chance of mold in this manner.
Carlos, I've actually had one of those water pillows sprout a lovely bouquet of ugly green mold, so be warned. I think they're meant to be more or less disposable.

As mentioned in the article, rehydrating is not a panacea. The result will never be as good as the original, freshly opened tobacco was, but it can be pretty darned good.

Of course, you read it, so you knew that... ;)
 

Carlos

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glpease":kxvmt49y said:
Carlos":kxvmt49y said:
Good deal. I have been quite pleased with bringing back some fairly dry blends. Most recently using water pillows, laying on top of their plastic bags, which in turn was laying upon the dry tobacco inside of a hard Ziplock container. Took several days to feel right to me. The water pillow got noticeably smaller.

This way no tobacco was actually wet. I hope to reduce any chance of mold in this manner.
Carlos, I've actually had one of those water pillows sprout a lovely bouquet of ugly green mold, so be warned. I think they're meant to be more or less disposable.

As mentioned in the article, rehydrating is not a panacea. The result will never be as good as the original, freshly opened tobacco was, but it can be pretty darned good.

Of course, you read it, so you knew that... ;)
Oh, yes. I should have noted that I used a new water pillow.
 

Bulldog Bruce

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Iv'e had some luck by placing tobacco in glass jar, I use a wide mouth candle jar, one of those commercial ones with plastic stopper ring. Hang cotton cloth, damp, inside jar'above' tobac. Place one of those clay moisteners(SHMBO'd uses one for brown sugar) which has been soaked a couple of hours on cloth, check in 8-10 hours.

Bd

Never Forget!
 

jhuggett

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You all should move to western WA... my tobacco never dries out. :lol:
 

Oddball

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I have a Peterson leather pipe and tobak pouch and if I leave tobak in it over night it is usualy dry and crumbles into dust.
When I was at school the average humidity was 11% in the winter and 18% in the summer so I used 2-3 of the clay disks per jar.
Colorado climate is not tobacco friendly.
 

GarWood

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I've been looking for these "clay discs" - anybody have a link to a supplier? Thanks in advance :)

Oh, and what the heck is a "water pillow"? :suspect:
 

Dock

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I've tried it myself with some dried out tins though with mixed results.I laid the tobacco out on newspaper and spritzed it sparingly with a bottle of distilled water.I was able to get the moisture back into the leaf but upon smoking it seemed that most of the character of the tobacco was just gone.

Friend Rich Esserman mixes VERY dried out tobacco with fresh stuff in a "stir fry" fashion and swears by the results.It's not something that I've tried myself as I smoke flakes now almost exclusively.It may me something worth experimmenting with for others though...

Best,
D.J.
 
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Anonymous

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instead of wetting a cloth
let the tobac set outside under cover during a long rain
This might keep the flavor this is natural humidity
 
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