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I'm shocked....

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Bent Stem

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...at the number of people on TR that seem to be unable to allow their tobaccos to age properly. :affraid:
Tonight, again, reading through the reviews, so many people seem to be unable to allow what could be great tobaccos to age for at least a few years. I just don't get it. If so many tobaccos only get better with a few years age then why not let it happen?
In my opinion, it's worth the wait. What are your thoughts?
 

Bent Stem

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Yak":3yb930ax said:
There is no cure for that.

:face:
It makes for frustrating reading of the reviews. Example: "I opened my fresh tin of XXX tobacco and it was good but not great. Will put it away for a while since it is supposed to age well."
2 months later: "Wow! what a difference aging makes on this tobacco..."
 

Hermit

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What bugs me is when a review begins: "I hate this type of blend but..."
 

Mikem

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Unfortunately not everyone is as fortunate as some of us who can afford to cellar their blends three to five years before smoking. I may be mistaken but I thought that Mr. Pease had a post a while back and said some blends are made to be smoked without a lot of aging. A lot of times when buying a new blend I purposely buy several tins. One for trying the blend out and the rest for cellaring.
 

Bent Stem

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Mikem":wx7gu8rh said:
Unfortunately not everyone is as fortunate as some of us who can afford to cellar their blends three to five years before smoking. I may be mistaken but I thought that Mr. Pease had a post a while back and said some blends are made to be smoked without a lot of aging. A lot of times when buying a new blend I purposely buy several tins. One for trying the blend out and the rest for cellaring.
I sure don't see it that way. More a matter of self-discipline than money to me. If you want a great smoke tomorrow you have to leave it alone today.
 

Rail Man

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Bent Stem":e7pfkk8b said:
I sure don't see it that way. More a matter of self-discipline than money to me. If you want a great smoke tomorrow you have to leave it alone today.
The question is what do we do in the mean time? My cellar is young to begin with and I can't sit around and wait for everything to age to perfection. It's going to be a long time before I'll be able to consistently smoke aged blends and that doesn't factor in the new blends that come out every year. I think it is, in sorts, a matter of money because your cellar will need to be big enough in order to have tins sit and age while at the same time pulling some out to smoke and if one doesn't have the funds to replace those opened tins, plus a few more, they will never get to a point where aged blends can be consistently smoked. If discipline is sitting and twiddling my thumbs for a few years waiting then count me as undisciplined.
 

pipetongue1

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afternoon All, i f you check out my Cave here on BOB you will see that is what I have done, smoked some and built up bulk, this list does not include tins, my cellar is coming up on 5 yrs. Patience, Ken :tongue:
Pacem en Puffing! :tongue: From The Northeast Kingdom! :tongue:
 

Buck

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Bent Stem":rdi5hrd3 said:
Mikem":rdi5hrd3 said:
Unfortunately not everyone is as fortunate as some of us who can afford to cellar their blends three to five years before smoking. I may be mistaken but I thought that Mr. Pease had a post a while back and said some blends are made to be smoked without a lot of aging. A lot of times when buying a new blend I purposely buy several tins. One for trying the blend out and the rest for cellaring.
I sure don't see it that way. More a matter of self-discipline than money to me. If you want a great smoke tomorrow you have to leave it alone today.
What good is "aged" tobacco to the homeless/unemployed or the dead?

Enjoy life as it comes and don't fuss so much. 8)

:pipe:
 

Hermit

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Mikem":g8zw2mb1 said:
Unfortunately not everyone is as fortunate as some of us who can afford to cellar their blends three to five years before smoking. I may be mistaken but I thought that Mr. Pease had a post a while back and said some blends are made to be smoked without a lot of aging. A lot of times when buying a new blend I purposely buy several tins. One for trying the blend out and the rest for cellaring.
Also a dilemma for those of us who have recently started.
I only smoke aged cigars, but my cellar began in April.
As time passes, I will have aged stock; so far I have
put away about seventy pounds.
 

Bent Stem

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:affraid:

Hermit, I think there was a typo in your last past. On my screen it said you had recently started on the pipe and had stored away 70 POUNDS OF TOBACCO!

:affraid: :affraid:
 

Hermit

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Bent Stem":zpa5eifz said:
:affraid:

Hermit, I think there was a typo in your last past. On my screen it said you had recently started on the pipe and had stored away 70 POUNDS OF TOBACCO!

:affraid: :affraid:


I won't be satisfied until I have my weight in tobacco.*
(another hundred pounds to go..unless I put on a few over the Holidays.) :)


* (not including eight coolers and seven humidors of cigars.)
 

alfredo_buscatti

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I try something to the tune of 50/100 g and if I like it buy more. Most of "more" is left to age. Some tobacco that I believe doesn't have much aging potential I don't age, although I may buy in quantity, i.e. GH Dark Flake. The long and short of it is that many blends in my cellar will be 5 y/o sometime in 2009: McCranie Red Flake->18 5 y/o tins 1/09, ditto Escudo, although 28 tins.

I very definitely will age a 3 y/o tin to 5 years. I just keep smoking what's young although I treat myself once in awhile.
 

mark

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how would you know what to age if you don't try it first to find out if you like it,,,I'm not going to cellar tobacco I don't care for in hopes I'll love it after it ages,,,,hence the rookies dilema,,,,I've given away a lot of tobacco in the search, and cellared very few,,,,

the search goes on :penguin:
 

Wet Dottle

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mark":93n0dgd3 said:
how would you know what to age if you don't try it first to find out if you like it,,,I'm not going to cellar tobacco I don't care for in hopes I'll love it after it ages
Exactly! If you know what you like and want to save it for later, or for aging, that's fine. But it's an asinine idea to chastise anyone for not aging their tobacco.
 

Hermit

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mark":7kien3iw said:
how would you know what to age if you don't try it first to find out if you like it,,,I'm not going to cellar tobacco I don't care for in hopes I'll love it after it ages,,,,hence the rookies dilema,,,,I've given away a lot of tobacco in the search, and cellared very few,,,,

the search goes on :penguin:
That's a big problem. I never buy more than one of anything until I've tried it.
I have a lot of blends I haven't tried yet and I won't know if I want to cellar any
until I know I like em.
 

Slow Puffs

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Perhaps a little different slant on cellars and aging.

When, I find a blend I like, I'll buy multiple tins.

But, what is a good length for aging? 5 years, 10 years?

Then there is my chronological age. At 60, I'll be 70 in 10 years time, if I,m fortunate enough to live. Hell, what would I do with so much tobacco at age 70 if I kept building and building the cellar.

This year I have pared way down compared to what I have ordered in previous years. I have many tins I haven't tried. I have begun to open and smoke these, inter-disbursed, with my favourites. Each day, I smoke ones that I enjoy, but also have a pipeful or two of those previously unsmoked blends... sort of the best of both worlds...

If I was one of youse younsters... you don't need to be in such a hurry... at some point the aging process lessens any improvements, from what I understand. Mark would argue that Walnut is always good no matter what age.
 

smokey422

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My experiences with aging tobaccos suggest that it is most effective with VAs, least effective with aromatics. It also seems to help English and Balkan blends, while burleys seem to be kind of neutral. If you smoke C&D blends, one alternative if you can't wait on aging is to have them press the blend.

Smokey
 

gospelman

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What I try to do is, everytime I go to buy some baccy, I buy two tins of the same blend. One to smoke now, one to store. Then next time, same deal...so now I've got two tins in storage, and still enjoying it in the here and now. And so on and so on, till I can get a pretty good stash built up.

Having said that, I tend to follow the "life is too short" philosophy. You know, don't wait for a special occasion to wear your best shirt...that kind of thing. Today is a special occasion; tomorrow might not be here.

Damn, that sounded depressing...sorry! :cheers:

Mike
 
A

Anonymous

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Yo, Rail Man

It isn't as difficult as you're making it out to be.

GLP stuff isn't available in bulk form, but half-pound tins bring the per-ounce cost way down. If you can't afford to age a whole half-pounder, put it up in jars -- some for now, some for later.

If I were rich, I'd buy Full Virginia Flake in little tins. When its tinned right after it's made, it's way better quality stuff. But I'm not rich, so I get one-pound boxes of it and put it up in mason jars. Same deal. Nearly as good, some to smoke now, and some put back for later too.

etc.

If you don't know what you like yet, then that's a separate issue.

:face:




:face:
 
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