Quantcast

Looking for a decent 2nd pipe.

Help Support Brothers of Briar:

Jason

Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2008
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Hi folks,

I've been reading about tobacco ghosts and dedicating one pipe for one type of tobacco. I only have one aromatic blend from the local tobacconist and that's what's used in my one and only pipe: a Missouri cob. I'm interested in a decent pipe (probably briar) that won't be too expensive and will last a long time. I've looked on-line and have been awed by the myriad selections out there. I like the churchwarden design and stumbled across some of these:

http://store.pipesandcigars.com/churchwardens.html

Some of the small churchwardens look great and are priced nicely to boot. I like the Gardensana small churchwarden in smooth apple.

Then again, what do I know about the hobby? I'm open to try just about any design so long as it isn't too expensive. I don't have the luxury to sit around and smoke for hours, and I'm on the go often. I'd prefer a smaller pipe that is durable for my travels, and allows me to get a quick 20 minute smoke now and then.

The local tobacco shop has a number of Dr. Grabow pipes in stock. What do you experts think of that brand? I like how they have filters - I'm sure I'd be gurgling to no end without one.

And for smoking technique; how long should I be able to wait before needing to puff to keep it lit? Sometimes I have to puff quite frequently to keep it lit, like within a 5 second span. I assume that probably means my packing of the pipe wasn't very good?


Thanks and sorry for all the mundane noob questions.

- jason
 

Doc Manhattan

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2008
Messages
3,305
Reaction score
1
If you're enthusiastic about a churchwarden shape, but want something a little more convenient for smoking on-the-go, consider a "convertible" churchwarden pipe, which comes with two interchangable stems, one long, and one short. Stanwell have some nice ones in their "Hans Christian Andersen" series.

In general, Stanwell make some good pipes, especially in terms of value.

Don't hesitate to get another Missouri Meerschaum or two while you find what's right for you. In my experience, cobs deliver a lot of satisfaction for the money without a lot of fuss.
 

vaperfavour

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Messages
490
Reaction score
0
every 5 seconds? your smoking too fast. remember to slow down your puffing cadence, it takes time to learn how to smoke your pipe, but the rewards are immense. pack looser, try the old rhyme, once like a baby, once like a lady, then like a man in the packing technique this will help, remember to pack more tobacco in the pipe last. most start off with aromatics but the real pleasure is in the fine virginias and english blends available. when i smoke i puff eery twenty to thirty seconds sometimes even longer than that, sometimes i even let the pipe go out completely, most importantly have fun.
 

Jason

Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2008
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
I found a Salvinelli Toscana model I liked a lot. Not a churchwarden, but the shape is nice and I really like the grain of the wood. I also stumbled across the "Frank Method" of packing the pipe. Looks a tad complicated, but looks worth a try. Perhaps that'll enable me to go longer between puffs.
 

mark

Broken Pipe
Staff member
Joined
Jul 2, 2008
Messages
4,134
Reaction score
0
I've found the frank method solved a lot of my packing problems. If you punch in a search for "Frank method" you'll find a three part video on youtube demonstrating the procedure. It's easier than it looks once you've done it a few times. There's nothing wrong with a cob, they have small sizes for short smokes. I agree that Stanwell offers good quality for the price and they offer a wide range of sizes and styles. Have fun smoking, it's an adventure.
 

piperguckert

Active member
Joined
Feb 6, 2008
Messages
33
Reaction score
0
I have a wide range of pipes from Dr Grambows to dunhills and out of them all i have found that i favor savinelli the most the a nice pipe for the money they smoke wonderfuly. I recremend you probley buy estate pipes expechaly as u are a new smoker becose an estate pipe dosnt need to be broken in as it is alredy done for You with the added bonis that they are generaly cheeper than new.
 

CPT/VSG

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2008
Messages
202
Reaction score
0
I'd suggest a J.M. Boswell for a reliably good hand-made pipe. Typically, his Classic series is around $50 and most of the regular sized pipes are less than $100. I have three of his and they are all good smokers.
 

Jason

Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2008
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
I got my new Savinelli Toscana and Gardensana mini-churchwarden today. I tried the Gardensana with some Peterson Gold Blend. It was quite pleasant and I was able to reduce my puffing pace a lot and keep the bowl cooler. No gurgling encountered. The nice small bowl is perfect for short smoking sessions and is also very lightweight. I placed a rubber stem guard on it and was able to retain it in place comfortably with my teeth.
In regards to the temp of the pipe, how warm should it normally get? I was sitting out on my porch doing some leather-working for a new holster and at my puffing pace, it got warm to the touch. There was a slight breeze, if that makes a difference. I still had to re-light numerous times, but I got little to no tongue bite, so I was quite happy about that. I'll try the Savinelli next. This one has the interesting balsa filters. Any tips on how to smoke this one?
I saw JM Boswell has a Minie-ball pipe. That is very cool. I'll have to consider that as my next one.


Thanks.

- jason
 

puros_bran

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 10, 2007
Messages
10,992
Reaction score
0
A pipe will naturally get hot...theres a fire in it. :D

If its to hot to hold in your hand comfortably,set it down.

If you wear gloves or something touch the bowl to your cheek, same principle, it it hurts set it down...


Wind will affect the burn rate. Some people use little wind screens.. I just dont smoke outside if its to windy..
 
Top