New chair!

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Jevverrett

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Just waiting on delivery of this bad boy next Thursday.. My old chair finally had a catastrophic failure, and can no longer open the foot rest. I got it secondhand as a gift about five years ago, and it has served me well. I really wanted to get it with the brass tacks on the arm trim, but I would have had to wait till February for it to ship. I’d be a fool to wait that long to put my feet up with a pipe, right? It got me thinking, for me, a good, comfy chair to smoke in is a great enhancement to the experience. Has a very patriarchal, grandfatherly sort of a feel to it for me. My Dad had a lazy boy, and so did his. Sitting in it as a boy always got me a “get up” from either of them when they got home. Granted, I’ve smoked a pipe sitting on a homer bucket in a tree stand, and it was a great smoking experience lol. I’m sure somebody else here has to share my passion for the “holy grail”of smoking chairs. What’s yours?
FDBAC35A-83AD-41EE-ACE7-99E22A9492CB.jpeg
 

daveinlax

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Looks Very Comfy! My chairs, foot stools and side table are my most important pipe requisites.
 

Ranger107

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When I was back in the midwest my former wife did not mind if I smoked in the house. Had a big comfy Lazy Boy recliner in a dark sage green. This was early 80s. Sat in the LR right in front of the fireplace. I fondly remember puffing away, watching the fire, reading Field and Stream, and watching snow falling through the very large picture window, my big Newfie at my feet. That was very definitely sublme.
 

RSteve

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I have an almost identical chair, but in a lighter color. I've had it since 2006, but it shows no wear because I rarely ever sit on it. I bought it following cervical neck surgery as a place to sleep. If I sit on it to watch TV, I inevitably doze off.
 

Ranger107

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Well, my patio chair, an outdoor swivel rocker bit the dust this am. Sat down, leaned back, and bam. Almost fell backwards out of the chair, lol. The spring steel support on the right side snapped in two. Will see if I can get it welded. If not, it's off to look for a replacement.
 

D.L.Ruth

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Looks really comfy. I've had my lazy boy now for about 7 or 8 years now. It's not leather and I don't smoke inside. Really wish I could just sit in it and have a smoke in the evening
 

Ranger107

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Looks really comfy. I've had my lazy boy now for about 7 or 8 years now. It's not leather and I don't smoke inside. Really wish I could just sit in it and have a smoke in the evening
DL, check out the thrift stores for a used one and put it outside. Wife and I were browsing the local Goodwill store couple of weekends ago and spotted a decent Lazy Boy, worn but very usable and comfortable, for only $65.
 

Sherlock

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Wow, nice chair! Smoke or Sleep? Thanks for posting.:):love:(y)
 

Brewdude

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The last LazyBoy recliner I had was an oversized model…piece of crap…only lasted 25 years. 😁👍❤️

Not to one-up you, but my LazyBoy I bought back in '84 is still in regular use. I did have to replace some gadget on the feet rest assembly and once had another problem that required taking it to the warehouse for repair. But back then they had a lifetime warranty and they fixed it on the spot at n/c.


Cheers,

RR
 

Ranger107

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Yep, the sage green one I had back then was purchased the first year after we got married in 73. It outlasted the 20 year marriage, lol. Think I got rid of it in 96 when I moved to Tucson. Never did break but the fabric on the footrest was getting a bit shabby.
 

Blackhorse

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BrewBoy…I can’t recall the number of times I had to repair the footrest latch mechanism. I would tip the thing over on its side and study the mechanism (it happened infrequently so I have to relearn the repair protocol every time) and there was some kind of metal hinge stop thing that came into contact and would wear down, its corners wearing smooth. It’d have to file the surface sharp and flat again…then it worked fine…til the corners wore smooth again. Took about a year to wear each time.

My wife and kids couldn’t fathom how I was able to fix the thing. Poor helpless darlings. I told them many times that all you needed to do was LOOK at a mechanism and visualize how it worked and find the part that looked broken or wasn’t doing what it was supposed to do. If a oart of it was actually broken you might be out of luck but if it was just worn or misaligned or something you might be able to adjust it back into spec. They’d look at me like I was from Mars or something. I’d just roll my eyes. I’d think of my Uncle Aksel out on the farm in Northern Minnesota with parts of a pump spread out all over a table, just looking at it. Then he’s pick up a seemingly random part and gently tap on it with a hammer til some of it was “unbent”. Then once reassembled it would work fine…but squeaked a little. Then there was my Uncle Al who was a “Car Man” for the Northern Pacific Railroad whose whole job was fixing stuff on trains - lots of which involved jury rigging parts, etc. My dad, a doctor, was useless (or too impatient) with things like that so I guess it was good I got a little Norwegian DNA in the firm of uncles.

Reporting from the NEW leather recliner in my den…keep yer hands dirty and stay healthy!
 

Brewdude

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BrewBoy…I can’t recall the number of times I had to repair the footrest latch mechanism. I would tip the thing over on its side and study the mechanism (it happened infrequently so I have to relearn the repair protocol every time) and there was some kind of metal hinge stop thing that came into contact and would wear down, its corners wearing smooth. It’d have to file the surface sharp and flat again…then it worked fine…til the corners wore smooth again. Took about a year to wear each time.

My wife and kids couldn’t fathom how I was able to fix the thing. Poor helpless darlings. I told them many times that all you needed to do was LOOK at a mechanism and visualize how it worked and find the part that looked broken or wasn’t doing what it was supposed to do. If a oart of it was actually broken you might be out of luck but if it was just worn or misaligned or something you might be able to adjust it back into spec. They’d look at me like I was from Mars or something. I’d just roll my eyes. I’d think of my Uncle Aksel out on the farm in Northern Minnesota with parts of a pump spread out all over a table, just looking at it. Then he’s pick up a seemingly random part and gently tap on it with a hammer til some of it was “unbent”. Then once reassembled it would work fine…but squeaked a little. Then there was my Uncle Al who was a “Car Man” for the Northern Pacific Railroad whose whole job was fixing stuff on trains - lots of which involved jury rigging parts, etc. My dad, a doctor, was useless (or too impatient) with things like that so I guess it was good I got a little Norwegian DNA in the firm of uncles.

Reporting from the NEW leather recliner in my den…keep yer hands dirty and stay healthy!

It did take me a while to figure out which part of the footrest latch mechanism needed to be replaced, but once that was determined I found the replacement part on the LazyBoy website and ordered it. Think it came with a pair of the part but I only needed one and it hasn't broken since then - but I'm pretty gentle with it now when I extend or retract it.

The time I had to take it into the warehouse for a repair had something to do with the mechanism under the seat which I couldn't get to. But the repair tech at the warehouse allowed me to watch what he did with the idea that I'd be able to do it myself next time. Fat chance though as one had to have several special tools like a ratchet extension for a portable drill, and one had to remove the fabric first to expose the mechanism which involved removing staples and then re-stapling. All of which I could do I suppose if I was more mechanically minded, which I'm patently not!


Cheers,

RR
 

Zeno Marx

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This is exactly the kind of anecdote that re-affirms my belief that one of the best gifts you can give a young person is tools. Even if they don't know how to use them then, they will definitely have a use for them later. And with youtube tutorials on every fix we can practically imagine, there's no reason anyone shouldn't be able to remedy most of the problems in their home on their own. I had a math teacher in high school that lived by, "What am I doing? And how do I do it?" Look at the problem. Study it. Now approach it with method. The likeliness that you'll permanently screw up the thing is small. Do it yourself. *but it helps a whole lot if you have the tools
My wife and kids couldn’t fathom how I was able to fix the thing. Poor helpless darlings. I told them many times that all you needed to do was LOOK at a mechanism and visualize how it worked and find the part that looked broken or wasn’t doing what it was supposed to do. If a oart of it was actually broken you might be out of luck but if it was just worn or misaligned or something you might be able to adjust it back into spec. They’d look at me like I was from Mars or something. I’d just roll my eyes. I’d think of my Uncle Aksel out on the farm in Northern Minnesota with parts of a pump spread out all over a table, just looking at it. Then he’s pick up a seemingly random part and gently tap on it with a hammer til some of it was “unbent”. Then once reassembled it would work fine…but squeaked a little. Then there was my Uncle Al who was a “Car Man” for the Northern Pacific Railroad whose whole job was fixing stuff on trains - lots of which involved jury rigging parts, etc. My dad, a doctor, was useless (or too impatient) with things like that so I guess it was good I got a little Norwegian DNA in the firm of uncles.
 

Ranger107

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I feel very fortunate that my Dad taught me how to use tools at an early age. I learned carpentry, plumbing, electrical, auto repair, etc. Used to replace breaks, clutches, water pumps, etc. Now I can fix almost anything that breaks around the house. He had lived through the Depression era and his philosophy was if you can work with your hands you will always be able to find a job.
 
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