Quantcast
  • ~ How to Use the New Software ~

    Try logging in and if it is not accepting your password,, look to the bottom right corner of page for Contact Us and send a message.

Pipe waxing?

Help Support Brothers of Briar:

luckydogguy

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
124
Reaction score
0
What type of wax should I have to wax my pipes? Would anything with Carnuba work? Do I need a buffing wheel? How about reconditioning a stem?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Lucky
 

Dock

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
1,934
Reaction score
0
I've had good luck with two car waxes,Mothers "California Gold" Carnuba wax(solid) and a German car wax made by Zymol(liquid) which is much more expensive.You should find Mothers at any auto parts store.Zymol will be bit harder to find.Look at online auto detail specialty sites for it...

Best,
Dock
:pipe:
 

hazmat

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
232
Reaction score
0
Some folks are using Halcyon wax to shine up their pipes. I don't know a bunch about it but you can read up on it here:

www.finepipes.com/Halcyon/halcyon.htm

I've heard varying reports on this. Several fellows on this site have used it and I'm sure they'll chime in with testimonials shortly.

Otherwise, there's a product called Briar Pipe Wipe that some folks use. As I understand it, it works well.

Beyond that, you're going to have to get a buffing motor and buffs, wax, etc. if you want to use pure carnauba. If you have a drill press or even a variable speed electric drill, you're already halfway there. They can both be used as buffers with a bit of outfitting.

Define "reconditioning a stem" a bit more and you might get some suggestions in that general area. If you're simply talking about removing oxidization, there are several processes, all of which seem to end with work on a buffing wheel. Might just have to drop the cash for some wheels, etc. I'm sure you can justify this for the sake of your new hobby :D
 

luckydogguy

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
124
Reaction score
0
LOL! Hazmat, my wife is already starting to figure out that my little "hobby" is becoming more of an obsession!

I first thought I would just need ONE pipe and maybe a few nice smelling tobaccos...HOly Crap was I wrong! :roll: So why not drop a few more pennies and do this thing right?! That's what I say!

As far as reconditioning the stems. I just want to bring back a "showroom shine". Is it possible to do with just rubbing and polishing compound? Or is the wheel a must? Is a wheel a must for the briar as well or will the wax be enough with a cloth and some elbow grease?


THanks for the input so far guys.

Lucky
 

hazmat

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
232
Reaction score
0
luckydogguy":eqbepa80 said:
As far as reconditioning the stems. I just want to bring back a "showroom shine". Is it possible to do with just rubbing and polishing compound? Or is the wheel a must? Is a wheel a must for the briar as well or will the wax be enough with a cloth and some elbow grease?


THanks for the input so far guys.

Lucky
Hopefully LL will chime in here on this one. I can only speak to what I know and some things you just don't want to do with a good pipe when it comes to cleaning them up, buffing them out, etc. For example, buffing out a pipe the wrong way or too agressively can wipe out the nomenclature and/or strip some of the finish from the pipe. Same with the stem. A couple of things can get goofed here. If there's any inlay on the stem, you could buff it out. You could also ruin the nice, seamless junction at the shank/stem area. I've done the former, but never the latter, thankfully. Oh yeah. Spinning buffing wheels have a tendency to grab things like pipes and stems when you're not expecting them to(read: when you don't pay attention to what you're doing) and chucking them at high velocity across the room. This is generally considered "not good" and "to be avoided". Just a word of caution.

As Dock mentioned, you certainly can use a rubbing compound and elbow grease. Just be careful that whatever you use doesn't contain any petrochemicals and is as "natrual" as possible. Problem with stems is, in my experience, no amount of hand-rubbing is going to get rid of the oxidization. When I have ugly, oxidized stems on my pipes, I just hit them up on the wheels and move along. There are some other methods, but at some point, you have to buff them. One method involves soaking the stem in a bleach solution, which will "bubble off"(that's a tek-nickle term, boy!) the oxidation and leave the stem looking funky. After that, you have to buff it out to get it back to shiny. Some folks have had luck with.. hmmm.. was it the Mr. Clean Magic Marker or something to that effect? One of those stain removing "pens" that are on the market. I've never tried this.

You may want to bite the bullet and get some Briar Pipe Wipe or Halcyon, try it out and see how you feel about the finished product. It's simple to use, from what I understand and much less chance of goofing something up on wheels without laying out the cash for the gear. If you're bent on buying the gear though, do some serious asking around before you press stem/stummel to buff.
 

luckydogguy

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
124
Reaction score
0
I'll have to try that. Hopefully LL will chime in soon. I have a dremel tool that I think I will first try out on my "bargain bin" pipe. See what happens. :suspect:

I'll keep you guy supdated with that.

But, I won't do anything until I get more info from you guys.

Thanks a bunch and keep it comin'



Lucky
 

Midnight Blues

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 10, 2007
Messages
830
Reaction score
1
Also from Fine pipes is a product called Paragon. Its their next offering in hand applied pipe wax. I have this myself and it does a nice job. I would be real careful using a buffer, as stated before you could send your favorite pipe flying or you could inadvertently remove material or nomenclature. Also some of the automotive waxes contain solvents that could again remove existing wax and some of the original finish....
 

Davey

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
304
Reaction score
0
I have used Olive oil becuase i read somewhere that it helps keep oxidation down. I notice however, thwat the sheen does not lasst very long...not really permanent so to speak. I am afraid meself to buff, so I am looking for a way to "buff" without buffing...plus I don't have a grinder.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
1) Captain Midnight : Do you notice the Paragon penetrasting into and darkening the finish appreciably ?

2) Davey : There is (sadly) no long-term solution to vulcanite deterioration, although you can resist it. The sulfer in it combines with oxygen ; moisture & sunlight accelerate the reaction.

As far as wax goes, it's been my experience that there's enough of it on the average pipe to last just about forever. Rub it with a clean, soft flannel for maintenence.
 

showme1or2

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
253
Reaction score
0
Yak":4nm79q5q said:
There is (sadly) no long-term solution to vulcanite deterioration, although you can resist it. The sulfer in it combines with oxygen ; moisture & sunlight accelerate the reaction.
Hey Yak, you saying that made me think of this, which I'm sure has been thought of before but I know the answer not so...

Would it be possible to seal a vulcanite stem to prevent further oxidation? I realize there may be problems with sealing the air channel, but perhaps something on the outside of the stem could help keep a shine?

What say you all?
 

Davey

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
304
Reaction score
0
Thanks Yak,

I actually just hand buffed out some scratches on one of my stems with 4000 grit sandpaper...nothing left whatsoever in the way of scratches, but its a bit dull now....what to do shine up?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
All that I know to do (by hand) is keep going down through the increasingly finer grades, then switch over to micromesh (which ultimately goes to 12,000 grit for polishing gold).

You may find that using emory paper "wet" does a lot better job than using it "dry."
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
As Yak points out, hand-polishing is a bit labor-intensive, but the best thing I've found for returning a glossy black finish to your vulcanite stems is the Micromesh sculptors kit at The Compleat Sculptor.

From the front page, select "On-line Catalog," then "Sanding products index," then Micromesh. They have a couple of different kits available (14.95 to 21.95) with pads that come in 1500 to 12000 grit. Good stuff, and can be re-used hundreds of times.


http://www.sculpt.com/
 

tin man

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 10, 2007
Messages
216
Reaction score
0
Back to the wax,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,if you just want to bring the stem (and pipe) back to a showroom shine, the Halcyon does a fine job and it's very easy to use. I use Halcyon on stems, smooth wood surfaces and most blast finishes. I find it a bit difficult to rub out on a deeper blast or a bark finish. If you don't rub it all out, it looks a little bit too waxy when you're done, if that makes any sense. It does seem to have a cumulative effect too. In other words, after you have applied it several times, it seems to last longer with each application. Last but not least, a little dab will do ya'. A small jar should last you a very long time. In that light, it's dirt cheap.

Their other product is called Paragon wax and it is suppost to be superior for smooth surfaces. I guess Halcyon is for rough, Paragon is for smooth. I would be careful with either on a bark finish.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Would it be possible to seal a vulcanite stem to prevent further oxidation? I realize there may be problems with sealing the air channel, but perhaps something on the outside of the stem could help keep a shine?

I have long thought that there must be something out there that would accomplish this safely. But asking yields no ideas.

You would want the inside sealed especially, since the degredation in there is tainting the taste of the smoke.

My solution is Lucite replacement stems.

:face:
 

Midnight Blues

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 10, 2007
Messages
830
Reaction score
1
Yak":znh5pfor said:
1) Captain Midnight : Do you notice the Paragon penetrasting into and darkening the finish appreciably ?.
Yak,

In using Paragon I do not notice and appreciable darkening of the finish, It does add a nice rich luster. I apply it sparingly and buff it out with a soft flannel. I don't wax my pipes all that often but its nice to have a product on hand that works when needed...
 

luckydogguy

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
124
Reaction score
0
WOW! Great info. here guys! Thanks a bunch!


Davey,

Let me know when you get the 12,000 sandpaper. Send me some pics. I'm glad the little scratch came out.

Hopefully I can shine my new (for me) Charatan when it comes like the one in the picture on the other thraed.

:cheers:

Lucky
 
Top