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question for GL Pease re: aging Renaissance

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jj1015

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This question is for GL Pease (or anyone else who wants to chime in) related to aging. I'm lucky enough to find myself in a dilemma vis a vis some recent purchases, but would really like some advice so that I get the most bang for my buck:
I recently scored three tins of Renaissance, one of them from 2000 and two from 2003. My question is this: Which should I open first? I'm tempted to open the oldest one first, but the more I think about it the more I'm inclined to let it sit until at least the 10-year mark. It's most of the way there already, and that would allow me to open one of the 2003 tins now and cellar the other. In any case, the plan is to smoke only 5 to 6 bowls and then jar the remainder in two small canning jars that should comfortably hold at most an ounce each. I'm hoping to stretch these tins out for a few years by only dipping into them on special occasions.
This is the first time I've had quality tobaccos with this kind of age on them. I'm curious as to whether Renaissance is the kind of blend that would improve measurably over the next three (or five, or ten) years or whether it's probably already hit its "peak"? I also picked up a tin of 2000 Samarra and two 2004 Mephisto tins, and I have the same basic question pertaining to them.
Any advice here would be appreciated!
 

Carlos

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Be sure to examine the tins for any sign of rust of what may appear to be some tiny flaking or blistered metal. You see any. Try to gently poke a nail through it. Just using finger pressure. If it's rusted, you will know. Immediately transfer to a jar.

Using a jar for that which you are smoking will be good also.
 

puros_bran

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The Ren is already passed prime. I wouldn't smoke it. Yuck. Considering I like you and hate to see you take a loss send it to me and I'll send you a nice shiney tin of some good baccy.... Not buying the BS are ya? Damn, it was worth a shot. :D


If none of the tins are compromised by rust I'd open the vintage you have two tins of. That way you get to enjoy it and still have an older tin. The jar idea should be fine. Just remember the 'aging' process basically ends once to introduce 'new' air.
 

JohnnyFlake

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I'd take the oldest tin and vacuum seal it like a pice of meat, using one of the food vaccum sealer units, if you have one. Then just put it away for a few more years. It's already got 8 years on it, that's a fantastic start!

Johnny
 

glpease

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Personally, I'd smoke the older one. It's already gone past the magical 5-6 year point, so it's going to be superb. The others haven't gotten there, yet. You won't find a huge difference between tobaccos aged eight years and those aged ten, so waiting isn't going to gain you much. On the other hand, waiting one or two years will bring the newer tins into the zone.

Once you open it, BTW, transfer the contents to a jar and smoke it over a relatively short period. Once the seal is broken, the tobacco will begin to lose some of the volatile byproducts of all that age, and you'll want to ensure that you retain as much of the goodness while you're enjoying the tobacco.

I predict it will be really good.

-glp
 

regor

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glpease":fmakdd4f said:
Personally, I'd smoke the older one. It's already gone past the magical 5-6 year point, so it's going to be superb. The others haven't gotten there, yet. You won't find a huge difference between tobaccos aged eight years and those aged ten, so waiting isn't going to gain you much. On the other hand, waiting one or two years will bring the newer tins into the zone.

Once you open it, BTW, transfer the contents to a jar and smoke it over a relatively short period. Once the seal is broken, the tobacco will begin to lose some of the volatile byproducts of all that age, and you'll want to ensure that you retain as much of the goodness while you're enjoying the tobacco.

I predict it will be really good.

-glp
Darn good advice!! Thanks for putting it out here. I believe that you said this before at some point and some place. Any way Thanks :cyclops: :sunny: :sunny:
 

jj1015

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Greg,
Just to let you know -- this stuff is freakin' INCREDIBLE! I've never tasted anything like it. This stuff is remarkable. I'm smoking a bowl in a new, very large IMP Meerschaum while watching a thunderstorm roll across the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains just outside my window. The Syrian latakia, of course, is sublime but what seems to be really carrying the smoke are the Virginias (or is it some kind of Oriental/Turkish?). It's very smooth and EXTREMELY sweet, in fact, almost a Haddo's Delight-level of sweet.
 

glpease

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jj1015":4gopc3zu said:
Greg,
Just to let you know -- this stuff is freakin' INCREDIBLE! I've never tasted anything like it. This stuff is remarkable. I'm smoking a bowl in a new, very large IMP Meerschaum while watching a thunderstorm roll across the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains just outside my window. The Syrian latakia, of course, is sublime but what seems to be really carrying the smoke are the Virginias (or is it some kind of Oriental/Turkish?). It's very smooth and EXTREMELY sweet, in fact, almost a Haddo's Delight-level of sweet.
Good to hear it! I've not smoked a bowl of aged Renaissance in quite some time, so it's nice to get a report.

What's adding to the sweetness is BOTH the orientals and the virginias. While oriental tobaccos have less sugar in them, they still ferment, and once the blend has been in the tin for so many years, the tobaccos all begin to share their germs, so the mélange is greater than the individual components.

Of the original series, my fave with 5-6 years on it is Samarra. When I first blended it, I knew it would grow up to become something special, and I'm happy to report that Samarra done his daddy proud.

I'm looking forward to seeing how Westminster, Embarcadero, Fillmore and Maltese Falcon fare. I anticipate great things from all of them. But, as with many things, the waiting is the hardest part.

-glp
 

jj1015

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glpease said:
jj1015":pgyb3t22 said:
Of the original series, my fave with 5-6 years on it is Samarra. When I first blended it, I knew it would grow up to become something special, and I'm happy to report that Samarra done his daddy proud.

I'm looking forward to seeing how Westminster, Embarcadero, Fillmore and Maltese Falcon fare. I anticipate great things from all of them. But, as with many things, the waiting is the hardest part.

-glp
Thanks! I'll probably be dipping into the 2000 Samarra next, and based on what you just wrote I'm really looking forward to it (I might wait until it turns cold again first, though).
 

Mr_Houston

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I would also recommend smoking the older tins first. Renaissance is a somewhat mild blend to begin with and latakia becomes milder, or muted, with age. So don't let it get too old.

Also, it gives the more recent tins added time to age.
 
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