The Vegan Burger

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RSteve

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As I noted in another thread, my younger daughter has taken the vegan route and for the most part I've followed along. I've been experimenting with the fake burger, trying to get the right texture along with the right taste. Impossible Burger looks more like ground beef than the other products, but the texture is too smooth. Beyond Beef has the right texture, but the taste is a bit off. Impossible Burger comes in 3/4 lb. packaging and I can only find it at Trader Joe's. Beyond Beef is packaged in pre-formed burgers and I find them at both Sam's Club and Costco. Both products are priced about the same as organic beef.
I've discovered that a thorough mixture of one package of Impossible Burger and two Beyond Beef burgers seasoned with some onion powder, granulated garlic, a splash of steak sauce, and 1/3 stick of margarine makes a mixture, that when fried, is very close in taste and texture to a genuine beef burger. I haven't tried to cook one on the outdoor gas grill.
 

Blackhorse

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Excellent research. When my veggie daughter wants a burger we just cruise through BurgerKing. Even though they are famous for their exceedingly creepy TV ads they SHOULD be famous for their impossible burger. I can hardly tell it’s not beef. Though it’s not veggie, Burgerville (here in the Western USA) does a great turkey burger. When my wife is on one if her ‘no red meat’ binges, the turkey thing works well. Of course, there’s always PB&J.
 

RSteve

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We're having Beyond Impossible burgers tonight. I'd put 'em on the gas grill, but it's cold and damp outside and I have no desire to stand out there.
 

Carlos

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45-50 years ago, you could get veggie-burgers. Which, for a person like me, who likes mystery meat. They were all right. But as Blackhorse noted, there are some creepy ads out there. I don't care what they say, I will be able to tell the difference.

But turkey. NO! Turkey has no place in fake hamburger or sausages.
 

RSteve

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I don't care what they say, I will be able to tell the difference.
My older daughter is a carnivore, as was my father. His early death was directly related to his diet. His arteries were badly clogged. He was a chain cigar smoker, but his heart surgeon said his early death was a result of his diet, not smoking. Yesterday, I made Beyond Impossible tacos and left them at my younger daughter's house. The older daughter joined her for dinner. Today, I asked my older daughter what she thought of the taco meat. "Was it ground sirloin?" I thought she was joking. "No, it was a combination of Impossible Burger and Beyond Beef."
She was astounded.
 

Idlefellow

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It's not about whether or not you can tell the difference, it's about finding something that's acceptable. My granddaughter is vegan and it has been a challenge to come up with acceptable table fare, and more so now that summer grilling season is coming on. She's a very good kid and doesn't insist on anything for herself (she just makes do or does without) nor does she expect others to deprive themselves of what they like, so I'm always on the lookout for things that will include her in the group, even thought the rest of us may stick to our carnivore habits. I'm more willing to try her stuff than some of the others - I've actually had a few veggie burgers that I greatly enjoyed. Maybe some of RSteve's suggestions with a little alteration will come in handy. Thanks!
 

Zeno Marx

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She's a very good kid and doesn't insist on anything for herself (she just makes do or does without) nor does she expect others to deprive themselves of what they like
Most of the vegetarians and vegans I know are like this. OTHER PEOPLE make it an issue, not them. They eat before they go to events. Or pick at events. Bring their own snacks or whatever in their purse or backpack. Or eat afterwards. Don't say anything. Just do their thing and make no issue of it. It's a completely different relationship with food. While it is a special diet that requires closely reading labels, altering recipes etc, it often makes social events not centered around the food for obvious reasons. It's interesting like that.
 

RSteve

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Truthfully, when I entertain, whether it's been a dinner or cocktails and hors d'oeuvres, I always plan a menu that's acceptable fare for everyone to eat. I've advised and catered ecumenical events that required adherence to halal, kosher, and vegan participants. It's not that difficult with the vast amount of bounty available. Occasionally, there will be a surprise guest who has celiac disease and gluten is a problem. If they haven't informed one of us doing the cooking, the problem isn't ours to accommodate, but we do our best.
 

Zeno Marx

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Truthfully, when I entertain, whether it's been a dinner or cocktails and hors d'oeuvres, I always plan a menu that's acceptable fare for everyone to eat. I've advised and catered ecumenical events that required adherence to halal, kosher, and vegan participants. It's not that difficult with the vast amount of bounty available. Occasionally, there will be a surprise guest who has celiac disease and gluten is a problem. If they haven't informed one of us doing the cooking, the problem isn't ours to accommodate, but we do our best.
Well, this is also an interesting thing, because it gets complicated, or at least seemingly so for those who aren't within the diet. You really can't trust an outsider's interpretation of the diet. Depending on how strict the dieter is, they usually don't assume any food is truly up to grade or safe for them. For example, homemade tortilla chips. Innocent enough. BUT, were they fried in lard? Another example, Asian dishes. Did they use fish sauce as an ingredient? Another example, mashed potatoes. Did they use butter? Another example, salad. Did they throw in bacon bits or bacon fat in the vinaigrette or eggs? Another example, a bowl of corn or baked beans. Did they use bacon, bacon fat, or even something else with a meat product as a spice? I don't like to be rude, but to be quite honest, if a vegetarian or vegan or whatever else I might also follow isn't hosting the event, I'd rather them not even bother with it. I've heard Jewish folk say the same thing. "Did you do this? That? What's in it? Did you use x, y, or z?" is just crappy conversation and an unsavory situation to be in, or in which to place a host.

And some vegans won't eat honey. Not to start that argument. Just stating a fact. Or some won't eat out of the same fry pan that just had meat in it. Some people follow these things for health, which offers a good amount of leeway. Some do it ethically or for religious reasons, which allows for a lot lesser amount of leeway. Some come from a very theoretical place (fry pan example), and allow for no leeway. This is just my take on hosting events: the host coming from the outside probably should just avoid accommodating these special diets. No foul, no harm.
 

RSteve

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I've been a volunteer caterer for many events for over 50 years. As a general rule, invitations include dietary restrictions in the RSVP. Any animal product is excluded; all is strictly vegan. People know when it's specified as a vegan menu, it's strictly vegan; no fish, no seafood, no dairy or eggs and anything packaged must be certified as vegan.
At one dinner, we prepared a folder for each table with the name of each entree, the recipe, and ingredients.
Dishes and utensils are disposables.
Many foil pans used and pots and skillets are scrubbed, boiled, then placed in a deep freeze prior to use. This is all explained to the diners, of which there are usually 150 to 200.
The first year I was involved in this, it was basically clergy. The next year a few asked if they could bring their families. After that, it was Katy, bar the door. I absolutely love being involved and taking an after dinner round of applause.
 

Idlefellow

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It's both an animal thing and a health thing with my granddaughter, and as a hunter and fisherman and a lover of game my activities and eating habits don't pair very well with hers, but she doesn't give me any grief about it. To each his (her) own.
 

kingcobradude

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I don't really care for any of the vegan meat substitutes. Impossible burger and beyond burger both taste like burnt plastic to me.

As much of a carnivore as I am, I do find a grilled portobello mushroom does work quite nicely in place of a hamburger patty. Doesnt replicate the taste of hamburger, but again I am not trying to.
 

RSteve

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I don't really care for any of the vegan meat substitutes. Impossible burger and beyond burger both taste like burnt plastic to me.
I have no experience with the taste of burnt plastic. I have served the burgers, noted above, that combine Beyond and Impossible with some salt, onion powder, granulated garlic, a splash of steak sauce or Wright's Smoke Oil, and 1/3 stick of margarine to folks, without noting that they were vegan. No one said that the burgers tasted like anything other than griddle fried beef burgers.
 

RSteve

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I am not vegetarian nor vegan, but I'm leaning farther and farther in that direction. Water used for the production of meat may inevitably create huge shortages of water for human consumption. I am concerned for our future generations.
 

EZONSLOW

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Sadly,I have had celiac disease for most of my adult life, I can`t tell you how many times we have gone out to diners and I have gotten sick because of waitresses and cooks that are ignorant,or just don't care. I also get very uncomfortable when we go to dinner with friends and family and they make a big deal out of this...I know what I can eat safely and have learned over the years to not take chances,it`s not worth being sick for three days or ending up in the hospital because someone made a mistake!
 

kingcobradude

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I have no experience with the taste of burnt plastic. I have served the burgers, noted above, that combine Beyond and Impossible with some salt, onion powder, granulated garlic, a splash of steak sauce or Wright's Smoke Oil, and 1/3 stick of margarine to folks, without noting that they were vegan. No one said that the burgers tasted like anything other than griddle fried beef burgers.
Most people I talk to don't have that issue with the burnt plastic taste. But through genetics/body chemistry/ other reasons, that's the only thing I taste in the beyond/impossible hamburger.

To each their own
 

RSteve

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Sadly,I have had celiac disease for most of my adult life,

It appears that neither Impossible Burger, nor Beyond Burger has gluten.

DO YOUR IMPOSSIBLE PRODUCTS CONTAIN GLUTEN?​

The current Impossible™ Burger recipe (a.k.a. Impossible Burger 2.0) and Impossible™ Sausage Made from Plants have no gluten-containing ingredients.You may have heard that our original Impossible Burger recipe contained wheat protein. That’s correct, but we stopped producing and distributing it in early 2019.

 

RSteve

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From the Impossible Burger site:
"If you have any allergies or concerns about specific ingredients, we always recommend speaking to whoever's serving your meal (whether it's a home chef or restaurant staff) to get accurate information about what toppings and condiments they're using, as well as any cross-contact with other ingredients in their kitchen."
 
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