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Understanding Tobaccos

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Penguin

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I read through this thread and that one, trying to understand the basics of tobaccos. Maybe I'm being a little slow (I do have a learning disability), but I would like a little help.

When I go into my local tobacco shop, he has a section for pipe tobaccos in sealed plastic jars. They have names like "Black Bear," "Celtic Pride," and "Cherry Bomb." I assume those are the names he or someone else has given to them, and if I go to a tobacco shop in Slapout, Oklahoma, I can't say, "I'd like an ounce of Cherry Bomb" and expect the proprietor to know what I'm talking about. Maybe so, but I doubt it.

The shop owner has said that, for example, "Autumn Evening" is an "aromatic," which I take to mean it is valued for its aroma. The Cavendish, I know, is treated in a particular way (with sugar and a certain pressing method, if I'm not mistaken). I'd like to be able to tell the shop owner about my preferences and such, but I'm still very lost when it comes to describing tobaccos intelligently.
 

DrT999

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What are in those big jars are sold by suppliers under the maker's generic designations (Lane 1-Q) and usually sold under the store or chain's label. Unless the store you are buying from sells small samples (1/2 ounce or 1 ounce), I think you'd be better off buying pouches/tins. If you are looking to go through the basic over-the-counter/brick-&-mortar type blends, in pouches you have the Cavendish-based aromatics like the many Captain Blacks, Borkum Riff, etc. or the more burley-based blends like Prince Albert, Carter Hall, Half-and-Half, etc.
 

Penguin

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DrT999":5ov169gw said:
What are in those big jars are sold by suppliers under the maker's generic designations (Lane 1-Q) and usually sold under the store or chain's label.  Unless the store you are buying from sells small samples (1/2 ounce or 1 ounce), I think you'd be better off buying pouches/tins.  If you are looking to go through the basic over-the-counter/brick-&-mortar type blends, in pouches you have the Cavendish-based aromatics like the many Captain Blacks, Borkum Riff, etc. or the more burley-based blends like Prince Albert, Carter Hall, Half-and-Half, etc.
The store I go to sells tobaccos by the ounce or the pound. Right now I've been going through my local shop's tobaccos an ounce at a time to see what I like and what I don't, but the interactions usually such that I don't get a chance to ask him questions like, "Where's this tobacco from (Virginia, Kentucky, Mars, etc.)? Is it burley, or some other type?" I also just don't know enough to ask intelligent questions.

I'll have to keep an eye out for pouch and/or tin tobaccos.
 

DrT999

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Penguin":6wyryk7w said:
DrT999":6wyryk7w said:
What are in those big jars are sold by suppliers under the maker's generic designations (Lane 1-Q) and usually sold under the store or chain's label.  Unless the store you are buying from sells small samples (1/2 ounce or 1 ounce), I think you'd be better off buying pouches/tins.  If you are looking to go through the basic over-the-counter/brick-&-mortar type blends, in pouches you have the Cavendish-based aromatics like the many Captain Blacks, Borkum Riff, etc. or the more burley-based blends like Prince Albert, Carter Hall, Half-and-Half, etc.
The store I go to sells tobaccos by the ounce or the pound. Right now I've been going through my local shop's tobaccos an ounce at a time to see what I like and what I don't, but the interactions usually such that I don't get a chance to ask him questions like, "Where's this tobacco from (Virginia, Kentucky, Mars, etc.)? Is it burley, or some other type?" I also just don't know enough to ask intelligent questions.

I'll have to keep an eye out for pouch and/or tin tobaccos.
The advantage of the bulks (since they will sell you an ounce, rather than a minimum of 2 ounces) it that you can try more, and likely at less cost per ounce than the pouches (I think those are mostly 1 1/2 ounces? while tins are general 1.76 or 2). On the other hand, most people here will know what you're talking about when saying you like/dislike Amphora Original or Captain Black Gold and why and not know what the bulks probably are.
 

DrumsAndBeer

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Penguin,

I often times refer back to GLP's FAQ page for very basic information on tobaccos. His blogs "Out of the Ashes" "Ask GL Pease" are "BriarLeaf Chronicles" are worth reading as well.

http://glpease.com/FAQ.html

BoB member Oxman's posts are quite informative too..

https://www.brothersofbriar.com/t27730-my-tobacco-world-flue-cured-grading

https://www.brothersofbriar.com/t27707-my-tobacco-world-growing-tobacco

https://www.brothersofbriar.com/t27729-my-tobacco-world-flue-cured-virginia-fcv

Keep at it and soo enough your tobacconist will be begging you work the counter a few days a week... 8)
 

Penguin

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Thank you for the links. I am looking forward to reading through them when I can give them their just time.
 

Zanaspus

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Keep in mind that 90% of what you will find in B&M jars are Lane, Sutliff, and (perhaps) C&D aromatics. Should you really wish to encounter good Virginias, Virginia/Periques, Burleys, English's, etc. you really have to become acquainted with the online tobacco retailer world. Each of us has his own opinion of which e-tailer is best, so I won't beat a dead horse, but to truly experience the journey, you have no alternative.
 

Zeno Marx

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Proprietors give their own names to industry-widely available tobaccos for various reasons, but primarily, it is a tactic to make the customer feel like they are getting something unique to the store and unavailable anywhere else; locking in sales to those who fancied the blend. It worked a lot better pre-internet, but even back then, if you paid attention, you (relatively) quickly knew better. There were, however, honest shops that just called Lane 1-Q, Lane 1-Q. Lane HGL, Lane HGL. Etc.
 

Penguin

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I did notice today that the jars are labeled with Lane and such. Since I didn't know what those were before, I figured they were just some kind of inventory designation or somesuch. Now I know better. The descriptions also list things like, "A black Cavendish mixed with..."

I appreciate all the input I'm getting in this thread, and on this forum in general. You folks are very helpful to a new piper.
 

DrT999

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Penguin":mq49qgph said:
I did notice today that the jars are labeled with Lane and such. Since I didn't know what those were before, I figured they were just some kind of inventory designation or somesuch. Now I know better. The descriptions also list things like, "A black Cavendish mixed with..."

I appreciate all the input I'm getting in this thread, and on this forum in general. You folks are very helpful to a new piper.
we were all there once upon a time! (long long ago. . . .)
 

Stick

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Hi Mr P,

If you've not found it already, check out this link:

https://www.brothersofbriar.com/t19560-suggested-blends-etc-for-newer-pipe-smokers

It shows the main blend types with suggestions from various experienced BoBers as to what ones would be good ones to start with for those starting their piping journey. Most folks start with aros and then begin to branch out (nothing wrong with sticking with aros of course). It's worth trying all the different blend types to begin to understand what floats your boat. This will also help you to understand the nuances associated with each type of leaf.

Savour this part of the journey, Mr P. It's what makes our hobby so interesting!
 
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