Tell us your country's Slang you use.

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Aussiemike

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I am ever surprised on how people's accents, languages and slang are so different in small geographical areas. Like the UK for example or the USA. I love the Alabamian accent and many others like the New Yorkers are so different.
A Welshman,Irishman and Scottish all have unique accents and languages it amazes me being such a small area. In Australia there isn't too much difference in accents but while I was in South Australia as a lad everyone asked if I was an American because mainly the way i said pool,school, tomato and other words and as being the first Australian state(SA) to be settled by free settlers instead of convicts could always speak proper english they are quick to point out :)

I know Red neck because it's like a Bogan over here :) Tell us your favourite slangs you use.(y) or what you call people from different states for example;
For example, there are a number of entries for states (or former colonies), including: apple island (Tasmania), Banana land,Cane toads or Banana Benders(Queensland), cabbage garden (Victoria), Crowland,Crow eaters(South Australia), Ma State,Cockaroaches (New South Wales), and Sandgroperland or sandgropers(Western Australia).

These Shelia's are funny.
 
THE BIG FIL.....et al: I'm already pee-laughing.

Perfect thread with morning coffee. I can't wait for others to post their comments, especially the derogatory idioms, raunchy slangs, funny terminology, local references, ethnic or otherwise.

We are all adults, after all.
 
It has always staggered me, that for such a tiny country like the England, we have the most diverse accents from any country I have visited, and I've been to most.
For example, I was born and bred in Londons East end, and my missus was born in South London. And you can noticeably hear the different accent of us both. Accents in the UK literally changes not only from county to county, but also from town to town. As for slang, we'll being a Cockney, I intersperse speech with a lot of Ryhming slang
 
I’m from Mississippi and you have got to hear people talk here.

I studied acting in New York in the late eighties and early nineties. After graduating i got a job working for the school. I was the assistant to the housing director.

I finished a list of inspections and turned them into each buildings superintendent.

More that one called me and wanted to know what a plug-in was. I had no idea what it was really called. As in electrical outlet. In Mississippi it is a plug-in.
 
It has always staggered me, that for such a tiny country like the England, we have the most diverse accents from any country I have visited, and I've been to most.
For example, I was born and bred in Londons East end, and my missus was born in South London. And you can noticeably hear the different accent of us both. Accents in the UK literally changes not only from county to county, but also from town to town. As for slang, we'll being a Cockney, I intersperse speech with a lot of Ryhming slang

Where in London are you from? my Dad was born 1936 and from E17 kinda area.
 
Being born in the deep south I had a strong southern accent but going to college in the midwest I pretty much lost it, but it comes out sometimes like when I am talking to my sister.
Y'all come back now hear, lol.
When I was speaking to you on the phone, you sounded more American than most Americans 🤣🤣🤣
 
Canadians have a reputation for very neutral accents and few idiosyncratic terms, Newfoundland is an exception but I don't lay claim to that heritage. Similarly Quebec has plenty of regional flavour but most of it is french. Even my French ex-wife from Lyon couldn't decipher the terms they use. She called it Quebecois jibberish.

When I was younger, "eh!?" used to be an ubiquitous Canadianism but recently I can't say I notice anything like that.
 
It has always staggered me, that for such a tiny country like the England, we have the most diverse accents from any country I have visited, and I've been to most.
For example, I was born and bred in Londons East end, and my missus was born in South London. And you can noticeably hear the different accent of us both. Accents in the UK literally changes not only from county to county, but also from town to town. As for slang, we'll being a Cockney, I intersperse speech with a lot of Ryhming slang

I recall Professor Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady assuring Colonel Pickering that he, Higgins, could identify London dialects, sometimes within a few streets.
 
Canadians have a reputation for very neutral accents and few idiosyncratic terms, Newfoundland is an exception but I don't lay claim to that heritage. Similarly Quebec has plenty of regional flavour but most of it is french. Even my French ex-wife from Lyon couldn't decipher the terms they use. She called it Quebecois jibberish.

When I was younger, "eh!?" used to be an ubiquitous Canadianism but recently I can't say I notice anything like that.
Your France-French ex was betraying her ignorance of the language. The brand of the language used in Quebec did not develop as did the one in France and is consequently the older, and dare I say purer, article.
 
Being born in the deep south I had a strong southern accent but going to college in the midwest I pretty much lost it, but it comes out sometimes like when I am talking to my sister.
Y'all come back now hear, lol.
We coastal New Englanders (in my case, Rhode Island) have a speech that some "outlander" Americans think sounds on the British side. "Aunt" is pronounced like "aren't" without the R. Your rear end is your "bum." And ask a real R'd Islandah to say "I parked my car by the curb not far from a church in Harvard Square." Oh yes---and when you visit our lovely State, be sure and lunch on a cabinet and a grinder. And our stuffies can't be beat.
 
Buckle up your seatbelt for some newfinese.....



I was born in Québec so let me tell ya after 4 years in NL, sometimes I`m still wondering what people are saying. :ROFLMAO:

Some Newfoundlanders don`t understand what other Newfoundlanders say....and this is no joke, the dialects are very various.

 
Your France-French ex was betraying her ignorance of the language. The brand of the language used in Quebec did not develop as did the one in France and is consequently the older, and dare I say purer, article.
That is correct, Bud. It's, currently, close to the contemporary French spoken in Bretagne or Normandie, I can't remember precisely which region. I was watching a video about (the Bretagne or Normandie region) and was struck by how similar to Québécois the people in the video sounded.

For example, the word bas (sock) used in Québec is called chaussettes in France. Yet, bas comes from bas de chausse, which was the sock covering the foot and part of the leg worn centuries ago. It was simply shortened but is an example of how the old French was preserved.

Sometimes, I suspect French people simply pretend they do not understand Québec French; yet, people in Québec can perfectly understand the French. Now, why is that? ;)
 
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Your France-French ex was betraying her ignorance of the language. The brand of the language used in Quebec did not develop as did the one in France and is consequently the older, and dare I say purer, article.
I would agree. Took 4 years of French in high school, but when I was in Paris I had a hard time understanding all that was said. On the other hand, when I worked for Bombardier and made trips to Montreal and Toronto I had very little trouble communicating in French.
 
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