Hot Peppers

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Donk93953

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Having spent almost 50 years of my life in southern Mexico and Guatemala, chiles are a standard part of my diet.
May I direct you all to a traditional Maya recipe for a salsa.....Xnipec (SHNEE-pek) ( translation: Dogs Nose or Wet Dogs Nose)
You will find numerous interpretations on line, but the traditional Xnipec is very simple.
Couple...Habaneros or Jalapeños
1/2 a white onion
Lime juice...to taste...I prefer just enough to cover the ingredients
Touch o'salt

Split the chiles:
Get the seeds and veins out....WASH YOUR HANDS AFTER
Dice everything as fine as possible.
Mix lime juice
And pinch of salt
Place in container...stir....let sit over night in fridge....covered

Add to tacos, steaks, eggs...it has some real fire but the lime juice and white onion add a unique flavor
 

RSteve

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May I direct you all to a traditional Maya recipe for a salsa.....Xnipec (SHNEE-pek) ( translation: Dogs Nose or Wet Dogs Nose)
The traditional Xnipec is very simple.
Couple...Habaneros or Jalapeños
1/2 a white onion
Lime juice...to taste...I prefer just enough to cover the ingredients
Touch o'salt

Split the chiles:
Get the seeds and veins out....WASH YOUR HANDS AFTER
Dice everything as fine as possible.
Mix lime juice
And pinch of salt
Place in container...stir....let sit over night in fridge....covered

Add to tacos, steaks, eggs...it has some real fire but the lime juice and white onion add a unique flavor
Very interesting. I've seen innumerable recipes that are similar but add a tomato or tomatillo, or both.
Personally, I'd opt for the Jalapeños.
 

Donk93953

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I’m familiar with the “you say tomato, I say tomatillo “ recipes.
They are common and have more of a “pico de Gallo” feel, taste to them.
My years have pointed me to the Maya version I have posted above.
 

RSteve

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I wonder if the Maya version might make an excellent ceviche?
 

Donk93953

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hmmmmm.....ceviche is claimed by Peruvians and the Ecuadorians claim to be the experts.....and they might win the argument.
There are so many different styles of ceviche....much more interesting than the pico de gallo with fish added, we find in Mexico.

Peruvian and Ecuadorian cuisine is pretty much meat and potatoes.
Unless your taste runs to cuy, guinea pig, its not terribly exciting.

I think you might have something there....Xnipec ceviche.
 

Timbo

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That Xnipec recipe sounds delish, simple and easy, though I'd probably leave the seeds in as I like my sauces muy picante.

Was at a Chinese restaurant this evening that did a delicious spicy fried whitebait that was actually spicy. I was surprised to find something in Aus that gave me pause for thought from the heat.

If any of you guys make it over here when things calm down, I'll happily take you there for a feed.
 
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Donk93953

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SMOKING YOUR PEPPERS!
No, not in your pipe....but smoke them on the grill.
This is a fairly common Mexican spice (smoked habaneros).
Easy to do....and a few youtube videos on line for visuals.

Place your peppers on the grill...low/medium heat...
Let them get charred on a few spots on the outside...meaning 2 or 3 flips of the peppers.
Remove peppers from the grill and using gloved hands (surgical gloves are good...you don't want the seeds or veins under your fingers mails) tear the peppers apart.
Toss seeds and veins (if you can't veins are ok to stay)
Place shredded peppers back on the grill on an aluminum sheet with lots of holes....low heat.
You can toss on some sweet wood chips if you like.
Cover.
They will get smoking and start to lose their moisture.
When they are truly sticky on the sheet, remove from grill.
Place them on new sheet to dry out.
Then place in blender or coffee grinder or spice grinder
Reduce them to a powder.
Let them dry some more spread out on sheet.
Place powder in a well marked jar.
Wonderful addition to soups, eggs, etc....really nice with the habanero heat and smokiness.

WARNING...WARNING
Do not place habanero spice near coffee.
Too many early mornings, barely awake, someone in my crew would make the morning coffee and accidentally see the ground habanero spice and think it was the coffee.
They look the same....
Within minutes of percolating coffee/habanero spice boiling...the kitchen would have to be evacuated.....the habanero steam and smell was too much to bare....yes, like a gentler pepper spray.
 

Donk93953

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Thant Xnipec recipe sounds delsih, simple and easy, though I'd probably leave the seeds in as I like my sauces muy picante.

Was at a Chinese restaurant this evening that did a delicious spicy fried whitebait that was actually spicy. I was surprised to find something in Aus that gave me pause for thought from the heat.

If any of you guys make it over here when things calm down, I'll happily take you there for a feed.
Remember playing rugby for a couple of clubs in NZ in the dark ages.
In our tours around NZ and then Australia, I was always wanting something spicy....something to add a kick to the lamb and steaks, we were served.
Towards the end of my first year in NZ , I needed some spice ( I'm from California and spent the majority of my years south of the border)...some chili....I asked the waitress at one of the few steakhouses in Auckland...if she had any spicy/hot condiments I could add to my beef.
The puzzled look she gave me, spoke to the incredulity of my request.
She came back with some black pepper and .....wait for it...Colman's Mustard
 

Timbo

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Remember playing rugby for a couple of clubs in NZ in the dark ages.
In our tours around NZ and then Australia, I was always wanting something spicy....something to add a kick to the lamb and steaks, we were served.
Towards the end of my first year in NZ , I needed some spice ( I'm from California and spent the majority of my years south of the border)...some chili....I asked the waitress at one of the few steakhouses in Auckland...if she had any spicy/hot condiments I could add to my beef.
The puzzled look she gave me, spoke to the incredulity of my request.
She came back with some black pepper and .....wait for it...Colman's Mustard

Mmmmmm lamb....

Sounds like your waitress did the best she could back in the dark ages, depending on the style of mustard, it may have been quite spicy. Thier English mustard was the spiciest thing in Aus when I was growing up. More of a wasabi kick than a chilli kick but you still felt ALIVE after eating it.

I was fortunate having an adventurous gran and mum that both loved "out there" cooking, my gran did a version of spaghetti bol back in the 50's which was odd for a white Aussie to be doing back then, no Italian would recognise it as a dish but it was very tasty. I can post the recipe if you're keen, though I warn you it does involve Kraft processed cheese. She made it for family every time someone moved houses as it could go on the stove for hours and people could grab some as needed. A great comfort food for me when I need it.
 

Timbo

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Well here's the recipe, BTW we called our gran Moo.

Quantaties are up to you and it's very simple.


Moo's spag

Brown onions, mince and garlic together.

Add a tin or two of tomato soup and bring to boil.

Add spaghetti and let it sink into the liquid as it softens.

Add at least half of a small packet of Kraft cheese that has been grated.

Cook slowly.

Serve with extra grated Kraft cheese on top.

Obviously add more ingredients or remove as required.
 

Donk93953

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Well here's the recipe, BTW we called our gran Moo.

Quantaties are up to you and it's very simple.


Moo's spag

Brown onions, mince and garlic together.

Add a tin or two of tomato soup and bring to boil.

Add spaghetti and let it sink into the liquid as it softens.

Add at least half of a small packet of Kraft cheese that has been grated.

Cook slowly.

Serve with extra grated Kraft cheese on top.

Obviously add more ingredients or remove as required.
Made it for the kids...you are right...it was a hit
 
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