Let me resign ... PLEASE!

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DWSmith

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Sent an email to my boss Thursday morning letting him know I plan to resign. He replied that he wanted to schedule some time to talk with me first. Late Friday afternoon he sent me another email saying he is busy but wanted to let me know he hasn't forgotten about me.

It's now Wednesday and he's not gotten back to me yet.

I'm sitting here surfing the internet waiting for him to talk to me.

I don't know whether to keep laughing or start crying but this is almost the stupidest thing I've ever seen.

Maybe he'll forget about me and I'll just keep sitting here earning a paycheck. :)
 

Idlefellow

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I went to work one morning planning to resign a job, and both my immediate supervisor and the company owner were out for the day. I left a letter of resignation and never went back.

A co-worker at another job told the boss he was resigning. The boss was angry about it and demanded, "I need it in writing!" at which time the guy tore the corner off a piece of scrap paper that was lying there, wrote "I quit" and handed it to him.

Maybe you should just leave; he'll probably eventually get the hint.
 

Ranger107

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I resigned from a job once and the boss/owner said he needed 3 months notice to give him time to find a "qualified" replacement. So I agreed to stay the 3 months. 3 weeks later he came in and said he had found somebody and I could leave the following week. I said no, you asked for 3 months, I agreed and I changed my plans to accommodate you, so I expect to be paid for the 3 months. He started to argue and I reminded him that I had excellent rapport with the clientele and would tell them what he had done. He said I could leave and he would pay me for the next two months anyway. BIG LOL.
 

Volkditty

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I'm in a similar sort of limbo right now. Turned in my two weeks' notice right after the holidays, they asked me to stay on to the end of the month instead to train a replacement. Not a problem, I like my coworkers and will still have close contact with them in the new job so it behooves me not to burn bridges. Then they decided not to backfill my position after all and divide my duties up amongst the existing dept heads, so I'm just hanging out and collecting a paycheck. No meetings to go to, no phone calls to answer.

Congrats to you, DWSmith, on the move. Retirement?
 

Bluecow

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I told em and I told em. I've got my age. I've got my time. One day you will look around and say hay where did so and so go? They all laughed and said I would give plenty of notice, have a retirement forced fun meeting, an exit interview, and all the B.S. that allows the management to pat itself on the back and pretend that they care about the guards. One day I went on vacation and never went back.🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
 

DWSmith

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My boss couldn't find time (5 to 10 minutes) for me for a whole week. I sent him my resignation email last night and he called me this morning about an hour after he got in. ?!?!?!

Today is unofficially my last work day and I'm done for the day after about 2 hours work. He had me send him another email with 2 weeks notice and I had to fill out a form saying I'm retiring. The reason it took 2 hours is that I had already taken down my work laptop, monitor, power supply, etc. so I had to set it all up again.

Unofficially my last day is in 2 weeks but I don't work the 2 weeks and I get paid for it. I'm sure it makes him look better too somehow but I'll take 2 weeks of pay for not working.

I consider today my first day of retirement. I've been smiling quite a bit today! :)

I think I'll take a nap ...
 
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daveinlax

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Wishing You the Best! I never burn bridges and I spent last week keeping up my certifications just in case that perfect job comes up. I’ve never regretted retiring early but I miss the work but not the travel.
 

DWSmith

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Thanks Dave!

I miss coding and debugging programs but my most recent employer wanted me on a support team for about 17 years and that went away. Then they put us in a data entry group for the past year. Couldn't take it any longer.

I may start writing programs on this desktop and do what I want.

I didn't burn any bridges but I don't think any place would want an old fart like me any more. Unless I'm working on mainframe applications accessible through the internet or intranet I'm just an old dinosaur that refuses to take up some of the newer, pseudo silver-bullet technologies.

For 45 years things changed and I changed. Things kept changing, for the worse IMHO, and I decided enough is enough.

Anyone need a heavily experienced Assembler, COBOL, PL/I, Fortran, etc. programmer with experience in CICS, IMS DB/DC, DB2, VSAM and several other applications and languages? Just kidding.

I'm happy.
 

Ranger107

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I would hire you if I had any freaking idea what you are talking about. Just kidding. Pretty sure I could not afford you, lol. Could use a good stable hand to help with the horses. Do you know how to muck and tell Bermuda from Alfalfa? 30 a month and found.
 

DWSmith

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At this point I can barely walk so I can't muck out any stalls but I have 2 old hay fields totaling 14 acres (out of my 20 acres) and I know what alfalfa, field clover, and some hay grasses look like. I also know what Reed Canary grass looks like from fixing some erosion problems. That stuff seems to grow dirt!

If all goes well, about 6 weeks after my back surgery next month I may be able to walk better and can get some more of my own chores done. I hope all goes well so I can get back into outdoor activities, including more tractor time, during my retirement. I'm just aching to try to fish out my pond! :D
 

Timbo

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Anyone need a heavily experienced Assembler, COBOL, PL/I, Fortran, etc. programmer with experience in CICS, IMS DB/DC, DB2, VSAM and several other applications and languages? Just kidding.

Ouch, my man you really have seen some shite. Hope you made some coin from Y2K.

My greatest pity for you is DB2, hope it wasn't as bad as my hell with it. I was just trying to install it, it took me an experienced admin, five days trying to get it working before I declared defeat.

Stupid part is I was working for big blue at the time and they couldn't find someone to help me when they owned the damned product.
 

DWSmith

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You must have been a systems programmer. I did my stint for quite a few years working on MVS and VM operating systems as a systems programmer before I got into applications programming.

I had more fun in applications programming because I got to write my own code. I got to write code in systems programming too but it was just user exits allowed by big blue. Not quite the same.

I worked on some code from Bell Labs too. It was systems code for data communications. That was fun because we had all of the assembler source code available to modify whereas IBM source code was always on microfiche or snippets listed in their manuals in their proprietary PL/S language.
 
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Timbo

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You must have been a systems programmer. I did my stint for quite a few years working on MVS and VM operating systems as a systems programmer before I got into applications programming.

I had more fun in applications programming because I got to write my own code. I got to write code in systems programming too but it was just user exits allowed by big blue. Not quite the same.

I worked on some code from Bell Labs too. It was systems code for data communications. That was fun because we had all of the assembler source code available to modify whereas IBM source code was always on microfiche or snippets listed in their manuals in their proprietary PL/S language.

Never been a programmer at all mate, just a systems engineer/admin. Closest to coding I've come is sh, bat and PS scripting.

I can understand the concept of programming your own stuff and loving it but just can't do it myself, though admittedly that was pascal and fortran I was playing with back in the early 90's. I really should try in a modern programming language.

Oddly enough, though I couldn't code for shit, I could spot bugs a mile off. Made me popular at uni with friends that could code, so they wrote my coding assignments and I debugged theirs.
 

DWSmith

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'Systems Programmer' is sort of a misnomer so you may have been what was called a systems programmer decades ago. They typically install, configure, support, and apply vendor fixes/patches for vendor software. At times they may also write customer code for vendor code user exits to help customize some features.

I didn't find it as satisfying as writing application code. Systems programmer has a bit higher status than an applications programmer in some organizations.
 

Timbo

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'Systems Programmer' is sort of a misnomer so you may have been what was called a systems programmer decades ago. They typically install, configure, support, and apply vendor fixes/patches for vendor software. At times they may also write customer code for vendor code user exits to help customize some features.

I didn't find it as satisfying as writing application code. Systems programmer has a bit higher status than an applications programmer in some organizations.
There you go, I didn't know of the original systems programmer role so yeah, I'd fit in there somewhere. Probably similar to what my dad did with Honeywell mainframes back in the sixties/seventies.
 
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